Murray - O. briareus Our new addition..

eng50

O. bimaculoides
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#1
Long story short we have been waiting to find another hummelincki since our last one died almost a year ago. Live Aquaria listed a "medium Carribean" for sale yesterday early morning so we took a chance. It came today well packages as usual and appears to be a healthy animal although not really what we were expecting from a medium description! It is almost certainly a Briarius similar to our first octopus 4-5 years ago. It is acclimating by drip as I type now..initial parameters were 7.0 pH, 72 degrees and 1.025 SG. Here is a first look picture..

It is easily 16-18 " across with better than a 2" mantle. So I guess we won't have it all that long..will certainly go for a small next time...
I will post more as things progress..
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
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#3
It is easily 16-18 " across with better than a 2" mantle. So I guess we won't have it all that long
I wouldn't say that. Compared to some briareus that is still quite small.
 

eng50

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#4
Capt,
Yes i agree it could get quite a bit bigger! Glad its healthy and happy so far. It has picked a den area that is quiet and decided to settle there for the evening.. I wont offer food until tomorrow or the day after so it can settle in. There is plenty of "huntable" food in the tank if it is so inclined..

Tentacle,
I hope so, it is hard getting attached and then they die..Especially the ones that are interactive. When one decides to be willing to interact with its human caretaker it takes things to a different level and it is so hard to have them for such a relatively short time..

Bill
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#5
At one time I said that at least with O. briareus, size seemed to be an age indicator. I have since retracted that completely. Since we have seen 3 in the last week and going by the O. briareus that CaptFish and I are keeping, my guess is that these were born in the spring and would be somewhere between 7 and 8 months old. Anything younger than about 5 months will be quite shy so there is some advantage to an older animal when you first acquire them. This one may be slightly younger though as I don't see the typical "adult dent" in the mantle (it may be there but I don't see it in the picture). As I noted on iAlex thread, I am not sure what the dent indicates but it seems to show up around 6 to 7 months.
 

iAlex

Vampyroteuthis
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#7
I was going to say male because of the curled arm, which should be #3, but looking at it made me realize it he only seems to have 7 arms? So I dunno. :hmm:
 

DWhatley

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#8
Good spot Alex. This one definitely needs a name that means "lucky" as it has lost multiple arms multiple times and still survived. I can't locate the eighth arm position either and wonder if it was "born this way" :grin: or lost one very early that never grew back. We have seen pictures of a few odd animals with more than eight arms (probably from damage and odd regrowth) but I don't recall one with fewer than 8. Eng50 will have to monitor for a new little thread to sprout if it has been recently cut off so cleanly that we can't see where it belonged.

CaptFish has mentioned that he has seen O. briareus throw an arm (not something previously known by the forum about O. briareus. We do know that this is typical of the Abdopus group) but did not give the details. I wonder if it can do this at the top of the webbing, resulting in what we see here.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#10
Octos are reclusive. IME any "personality" you see in the first two weeks to a month is a matter of acclimation and will change. Often we see overt interaction that vanishes once they are comfortable. It may return but slowly, and with a lot of patience.
 

eng50

O. bimaculoides
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#11
Well not a whole lot to report, my wife has seen our octo twice now at 5 am, and has had some face time with it for a few seconds before it goes back to the den. No pictures yet but hopefully this means its becoming comfortable in the new environment!

The kids want to name it Murray for some reason but I am trying to come up with a name more related to the seven arms..

Bill
 

eng50

O. bimaculoides
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#13
Just a quick pic of "Murray" eating his third crab today. Working on the 6pm routine and so far we get the quick flash attack and retreat to cover, but it is progress!!



Bill
 

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eng50

O. bimaculoides
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#14
Just an odd observation, we noted tonight where Murray is located he has one larger entrance/exit area and has dug out three other small areas. We didn't think much of it until tonight noticing at two of the smaller holes he has extended the very tips (1-2") of two arms that are just floating in the current we assume waiting for any kind of food to come by..he is bedded in the sand with the three holes almost at 90 degree compass points..
Has anyone else seen this type of behavior with past or present Briarius?
Kinda lazy if you ask me! vs out hunting..or maybe it's just "feeling the breeze" per se'. Interesting either way..
Our last Briarius was in a 180 now front and it's den wasnt where we could observe this kind of close up activity..

Bill
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#15
I have seen the trolling for food in the water column behavior with O. mercatoris (a dwarf species - the only quick reference I could find was to an observation of new hatchlings but I remember mentioning it with the adults as well). I had not noticed in O. briareus until Yeti and have remarked on it in her thread.

Up until Squid (Carol's last briareus) the only octos I have kept that would den in an area with only one opening were O. mercatoris. All others have only taken dens with at least a back and front door.

It will be intresting to see if this one remains small like Yeti and if this is a common behavior for those that don't get large.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#17
I'm leaning toward that thinking but it may be that I just have not observed enough (ie, perhaps it is more species related or related to where they spent their first few months). In trying to pay attention to the behavior again, I do not see Octavia (much larger O. hummelincki who was fairly young when entering the tank but older than Yeti) skimming the water this way.
 

eng50

O. bimaculoides
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#18
For whatever reason I was suddenly thinking about this..

Do Octopus see in two or three dimensions?

Reading another post on here by GPX1200 that has two octos in two close tanks and reading how they interacted upon "seeing" each other made me think, if you were to take a video of your singular octo and play it back on an iPad or similar device next to the tank would the octo react? I don't want to try it as we dont want to take any steps backward in our progress with Murray, but it intrigued me thinking of the idea..

Just rambling..
Bill
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#19
You make me work too much :wink: but I did located an article that includes the information I remember reading more or less on this topic. The gist is that experiments with TV did not get octopuses attention but when they experimented with HD TV they found that the faster refresh rate allowed the octos to react to video food. Not exactly 2D vs 3D but related to the iPad thinking.

I also found an unread article of interest discussing cuttlefish and the added information they may get from their polarized vision

HOWEVER, it is my conclusion that O. briareus has very poor eyesight and seem to be very far sighted (ie can't see anything clearly that is close by) so if you experiment, try different distances. I believe my male and female could see each other across the room (about 20 feet).

I will also tell you that I experimented with a mirror and an O. mercatoris and the merc would not go to the side of the tank where the mirror was placed. Once I removed the mirror, it used the full tank.
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
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#20
HOWEVER, it is my conclusion that O. briareus has very poor eyesight and seem to be very far sighted (ie can't see anything clearly that is close by) so if you experiment, try different distances. I believe my male and female could see each other across the room (about 20 feet).
I still have no personal opinion on this, the jury is still out for me. but interestingly when we talked about ceph eys in marine Bio class. the briareus was specifically mentioned as being on of the octopus with better vision than most. there were no sources cited pertaining to where this information came from but the breakdown of the eye lead me to believ it is true. however like D i have noticed times where i ws thinking "how can not see that shrimp!" but other times i see them react to things i never would have thought they could see, i would to study this further on day.
 

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