A. aculeatus? | The Octopus News Magazine Online
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A. aculeatus?

hooterhead

Pygmy Octopus
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Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Messages
14
#1
I got this one from Bali. Of course it was shipped as Octopus sp. (no help there). Diurinal, Mantle approximately 1-2" (doesn't seem to let me see long enough to get more than a guess), arm length around 3-4" (one arm only). These are strictly guesses. He/she spends time in the open sort of bunched up as in the second and third pics. Still a bit camera shy but getting better. If these won't do then I can try for better ones. If I can get an ID, it'd be great but I'd also like to be able to gain a gender if possible. Thank you!

Brandon
 

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DWhatley

Certified Ceph Head For Life
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Sep 4, 2006
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Gainesville, GA
#2
What (approx) is the ratio of the mantle to the arm length?
Are there any eyespots (distinct circles - usually one on each side - not always visible) on the head (below the mantle) Note the blue circle surrounded by orange on my avitar?
Does it keep one arm curled even when the others are actively open (usually the third to the right)?
An extended arm photo showing eyes and mantle would be helpful.
 

hooterhead

Pygmy Octopus
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Oct 1, 2008
Messages
14
#4
No spots at all. Does often sport a "skunk" stripe down the mantle. Mantle to arm ratio actually upon closer inspection could be as much as one to three or one to four. Here's a better picture of the head during feeding. Hope it helps. I'll continue to try for a better full body picture as it will allow.
 

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La_Dispute

Pygmy Octopus
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Nov 17, 2008
Messages
8
#6
This is actually exactly what I was looking for, I just got the same octopus and was trying to figure out the species too. I was just wondering, how can you tell it's gender?
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
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Sep 8, 2006
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2,364
#7
Males tend to have over-sized suckers that are easily distinguishable from the rest. Sometimes it's not real obvious. Roy has observed their mating behaviors quite a bit so I'm sure he could provide you with more insight into what to look for.
 

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