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New member here, thinking about trying a cephalopod... suggestions?

crim

Pygmy Octopus
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#1
First off, I am a longtime saltwaterfish hobbiest. However I have never tried a cephalopod before. I am thinking about redoing a 35 gallon hex tank and would like to try a small octo or cuttle. Anyone have any suggestions on species and/or places that I may find them? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

monty

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#2
:welcome: That would be big enough for one Sepia bandensis cuttle or a dwarf octo, but you might want to go up to 55gal+ to have room for one of the more interactive and long-lived octo species.
 

crim

Pygmy Octopus
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#3
monty;128992 said:
:welcome: That would be big enough for one Sepia bandensis cuttle or a dwarf octo, but you might want to go up to 55gal+ to have room for one of the more interactive and long-lived octo species.
Thanks for the reply. This is a setup that I already have, which will be converted over. I appreciate the suggestion but I am going to see what I can do in this tank before I invest in another system.
 

Animal Mother

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#4
Your best option is probably going to be trying out a single or maybe a couple of O. mercatoris. They seem to tolerate their own species and they can be captive bred.
 

Amygdalan

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#5
monty;128992 said:
:welcome: That would be big enough for one Sepia bandensis cuttle or a dwarf octo, but you might want to go up to 55gal+ to have room for one of the more interactive and long-lived octo species.
Out of newbie curiousity, what are the longer-lived more interactive species you are speaking of?
 

monty

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#6
Amygdalan;129484 said:
Out of newbie curiousity, what are the longer-lived more interactive species you are speaking of?
either bimac species, briareus, hummelincki, or aculeatus.
 

DWhatley

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#7
Keep in mind that longer lived is relative to both the age of the octo when you get it and the short life span of all the home aquarium eligable cephs.
 

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