Mississippian Brachiopod

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Terri, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    My young friend Mason (8yo) brought me this fossil, found in a dry creek bed in north eastern Sumner Co. Tn. I'm really excited to learn that this is a Mississippian outcrop and only a 45 min. drive from here, now to find someone who will let me hunt their property..:hmm: anyway this is a fairly large brachiopod, bigger than any I've found around here. I've been doing a lot of searching and the closest I can get to an id would be Platystrophia but I'm just not sure. He's very curious and I told him I would try to get an id. for him, so do you think I'm anywhere close to the ballpark? :goofysca:
     

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  2. Solius

    Solius Blue Ring Registered

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    It wouldn't be Platystrophia sp as that is an early Paleozoic genera. Kentucky Paleontological Society has several old monographs on-line. Here is a link to Jillson's classic "Paleontology of Kentucky": http://www.uky.edu/OtherOrgs/KPS/poky/indexpoky.htm


    There are other good resources at KPS' site( http://www.uky.edu/OtherOrgs/KPS/ ), and too, at the KGS site: http://www.uky.edu/KGS/

    KGS will will unveil other resources soon, so keep checking back.
     
  3. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    Thanks for the links Solius! Now if I can pin down the formation, possibly St. Louis, Warsaw or Ft. Payne...(?) I'll do more reading later. :smile:
     
  4. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    All I can come up with is Spiriferid... possibly Spirifer sp., it looks a lot like the Early Pennsylvanian forms we have out here.
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    Well, it looks like we're going to have to rename this thread "Ordovician Brachiopod." :oops: The fossil was found in a little town called Bethpage, which are Ordovician units. So it looks like either the Nashville, Richmond or Eden group. From here I really don't know how to pin it down to the correct group or formation. :confused: The USGS website still really confuses me, I have a lot of studying to do! http://mrdata.usgs.gov/services/tn?...thology,Tennessee_Faults&WIDTH=768&HEIGHT=512 :sink:
     
  6. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Platystrophia :grin:
     
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  7. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    :heee:
     

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