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sort of stranded

OB

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#2
That is an amazing specimen, an EXACT copy of its future giant self...
 

DWhatley

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#3
Tough call on releasing that one since we don't know if it needs a parent for survival.
 

Jean

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#4
dwhatley;134809 said:
Tough call on releasing that one since we don't know if it needs a parent for survival.
Fortunately most sharks have minimal (if any) parental care. I didn't realize they'd be born so very small, Great Whites pups are quite a bit bigger when born!

J
 

DWhatley

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#5
Jean;134812 said:
Fortunately most sharks have minimal (if any) parental care. I didn't realize they'd be born so very small, Great Whites pups are quite a bit bigger when born!

J
Since these are sort of an oddity for sharks and are plankton eaters, not mammals that need milk but not born carnivorous eating machines and we have not seen one this small (according to the article - I think our local aquarium is hoping for a mating), I feel concern about its ability to survive without its parent. It may well be that they are on their own at birth but they are seen in groups like dolphin and I would not want to be the person making the call (especially since we don't seem to know anything about raising them from this size in a aquarium either :hmm:).
 

Jean

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#6
But we have never seen juveniles in those groups, our carpet sharks are born at 10-15 cm long and are on their own (also think of our fav's occis, fingernail sized and on their own! :lol:). I agree that we don't know much about these fish, I wonder if they hang around reef breaks as juves???

J
 

spinycheek

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#7
That's a pretty cool story, it's surprising it wasn't killed for some kind of trophy or rare meal. It also probably has a better chance of surviving in the wild than in the hands of people that don't know what it needs
 

baldtankman

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#8
Jean;134818 said:
But we have never seen juveniles in those groups, our carpet sharks are born at 10-15 cm long and are on their own (also think of our fav's occis, fingernail sized and on their own! :lol:). I agree that we don't know much about these fish, I wonder if they hang around reef breaks as juves???

J
I am glad they released it but wouldn't it have been amazing to find out what was inside the stomach (if anything). In a none fatal manner of course.

M
 

sedna

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#9
My husband and I dove with the 4 they have at the Georgia Aquarium- one of the most incredible moments of my life! It's amazing to see one so small- I'm glad that it was set free but I wish they had fixed it with a radio transmitter or some means of tracking it! I want these beauties around for my great grand kids and beyond to dive with in the wild!
 

Jean

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#10
baldtankman;134898 said:
I am glad they released it but wouldn't it have been amazing to find out what was inside the stomach (if anything). In a none fatal manner of course.

M
hmmmmmm new field of study, shark vomitology!!

(My friend used to call herself a penguin vomitoligist, because of how she got her penguin diet samples :yuck:)
 

DWhatley

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#11
When it rains ...

This was in the UK online news letter from Practical Fishkeeping (if you don't get it, you miss some good summary articles on new findings)

A Whale shark that swam into a freshwater canal in Taiwan has been returned to the sea by rescuers.

According to a report from the Taipei Times, the 3m/10' juvenile Whale shark, Rhincodon typus, was spotted yesterday morning in the Tainan Canal after entering via the fishing port of Anping.

The China Post said that large crowds of spectators had gathered to see the stricken fish within hours, and by early afternoon efforts were underway to return the fish to the sea.

Fire officers and conservationists used a lifeboat to navigate the canal and eventually used a net to guide the giant fish back out to sea.

The Whale shark, which feeds mainly upon small invertebrates via filter-feeding, is believed to have followed prey shrimp or fish up the canal from the sea.

The incident is the first recorded in the 90-year history of the canal.

Whale sharks, the world's largest fish species, can reach lengths of up to 20m and weigh up to 34,000 kg.

The species is protected on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Flora and Fauna (CITES) and is listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
There is also a short article on bioluminescence and fish found at both poles this month.
 

baldtankman

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#12
Jean;134920 said:
hmmmmmm new field of study, shark vomitology!!

(My friend used to call herself a penguin vomitoligist, because of how she got her penguin diet samples :yuck:)
How did she get them to chunder? Small doses of ND I bet?
 

Jean

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#13
baldtankman;135019 said:
How did she get them to chunder? Small doses of ND I bet?
Don't think she thought of that! It would've been easier than sticking a small hose down their throats and pouring seawater down it, then holding them upside down! (all done with the permit, sanction and indeed help of the local DOC officer!)
 

baldtankman

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#14
Jean;135034 said:
Don't think she thought of that! It would've been easier than sticking a small hose down their throats and pouring seawater down it, then holding them upside down! (all done with the permit, sanction and indeed help of the local DOC officer!)
Come to think of it, the hose and saltwater method sounds more humane, they DoC may never permit, sanction or indeed help to administer the highly toxic ND :roflmao:
 

Jean

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#15
baldtankman;135035 said:
Come to think of it, the hose and saltwater method sounds more humane, they DoC may never permit, sanction or indeed help to administer the highly toxic ND :roflmao:
Too true I think the LD50 is pretty low for ND
 

OB

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#17
:no_diamond:

I am closing down this thread for reasons of certified insanity :wink:
 

OB

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#18
(that was a joke)
 

OB

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#19
(honestly)
 

baldtankman

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#20
ob;135114 said:
:no_diamond:

I am closing down this thread for reasons of certified insanity :wink:
Now now Ob SOS hasn't as yet taken the "test".
 

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