Octo water temps??? Anyone?

Discussion in 'Tank Talk' started by SabrinaR, Apr 14, 2010.

  1. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I have been reading for a long time and I am finally getting my tank for an octo set up. One thing I have read is that cooler temps are better for octos then warmer temps because it slows there metabolism and they live longer. Some of the stuff I have read says they need as cold as 60 degrees. This seems very cold to me for a tropical octo. Am I wrong here? Or is there some truth to this? Maybe I misread it and they are talking about coldwater octos... though I thought they needed temps colder than that. Clarification please?
     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Temperature is species specific, so yes, you were reading about colder water octos at 60 Deg F. The octopus you have most likely seen discussed at the cooler temperatures are the bimacs from the Pacific Ocean. Tropicals are usually housed between 75 and 78.
     
  3. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    Proper temp for the Caribbean species is between 72 - 78 (I Keep mine a little warmer to emulate her natural habitat). The cold water species require temps from 56-68, 60 seeming to be optimal.
     
  4. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Depends on whether you want to emulate summer or winter in the Caribbean and where in the Caribbean the animal was taken. Temperatures around Florida are still cool, so 70 would be O.K. By August that would stress the animal and the high 70's would be better.

    Roy
     
  5. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    Ok so for year round (life long) temp 73-78 would be best? Is it true that they live longer at 73 or around there even for the tropical octos?
     
  6. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    I record the temp of the water on the sea floor exactly where I caught Legs. This year the temps went below 70 once and killed everything. The range where i caught Legs was from 78 - 84 right now the temp is 77 degrees.
     
  7. Joe-Ceph

    Joe-Ceph Haliphron Atlanticus Supporter

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    When it comes to my octopus tank, my motto is: When in doubt, do what nature does. So I think it would be ideal to change the temp every month in order to match the average monthly water temp in your octopus' native habitat. Although I have very little empirical evidence, it makes sense to me that temps in the low end of the natural range would tend to extend life (or at least not shorten it) so if I were to pick a constant temp, I would go with a temp that is 25% above the bottom of the natural annual temperature range. So for example if the average monthly water temp rangees between 72 to 84, I would go with 75.
     
  8. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    If you read my journal that is exactly what i have done.
     
  9. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    I agree with the when in doubt ... but I have begun to wonder if emulating temp changes, and especially the cooler ones may induce females to brood.
     

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