• TONMOCON VII Announced | MBL at Woods Hole | Apr 6-8, 2018
  • Thanks for visiting! TONMO is the world's greatest online cephalopod enthusiast community, with interactive content going back to May of 2000, and a biennial conference. If you'd like to join in on the fun, become a TONMO member -- it's easy and free. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more cephy goodness.


Madrona Point January 4 2014

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
19,806
Location
Gainesville, GA
#2
Did you see any eggs? The number of fish hanging around made me wonder if she was brooding but I could not identify any in the video.
 

Tom Hlavac

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
Messages
92
Location
Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada
#3
I didn't see any eggs, but is possible the eggs were behind the octopus, often they are positioned closer to the entrance than their eggs to protect them.

On January 1, in one of the vertical cracks at Madrona Point there two medium (35-40 lbs app) octopus, one healthy in appearance and one very grey and listless, possibly a female post hatch.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
19,806
Location
Gainesville, GA
#4
I keep debating on whether or not seeing a GPO in situ belongs on my bucket list. I am half afraid I would be so excited I would drown :grin:. Are they extremely easy to locate or did you just luck out in an area and timing or is this a particularly good year for the species?
 

Tom Hlavac

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
Messages
92
Location
Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada
#5
Slightly better than average year, I don't think anyone is taking octopus anymore locally (the fisheries management authority here has shut down the very small scale commercial fishery), although the sea lion population has increased over the past years.

You get used to seeing them in dens, it's much more fun when you see one out in the open. We have 50-60 pounders around here. They can make things interesting, especially if you let them get a hold of your regulator or mask, or they drop your weight belt for you. If you are a diver, the local dive shop (Sink or Swim in north Nanaimo) hosts regular free divemaster supported weekend and occasional Tuesday night dives. They can also arrange a charter, and probably get up close to an octopus. I rarely do a dive and not see one around here.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
19,806
Location
Gainesville, GA
#6
Do you see them in their dens during the day? I am totally chicken to do night dives and am probably too out of shape to dive at all any more but I think about the possibilities when I see footage from recreational divers. I'm on the US East Coast (but far from the water) and do what little diving I have accomplished in FL or one of the Caribbean islands. The only two octopuses I have seen in situ have been snorkeling.
 

Tom Hlavac

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Jan 19, 2007
Messages
92
Location
Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada
#7
They are most often in their dens during the day, much more common to see them in the open at night.

Check out the last video I posted - from back in 2000. It was busy eating another octopus when I took it. I killed that octopus to make octopus cakes, I don't kill them anymore (they are too cool to kill really).
 

Members online

No members online now.