I'm Confused on Tank Sizes!

Discussion in 'Cuttlefish Care' started by Mr. Krabs, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. Mr. Krabs

    Mr. Krabs Blue Ring Registered

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    I emailed octopets, and asked them about cuttles. I have a 125 gallon reef tank with a single fish in it...but it's crawling with bristle worms (need more help than traps...any fish that eat these?). He e-mailed me back and said that I could keep 2 common cuttles in the tank. I have an over-spec filtration unit that pumps 1200 gallons an hour, and the filters are rated for over 180gallons. I have a UV sterilizer, and two 175watt metal halide lights for the corals. Also, I have two maxima clams...will the cuttles eat these? Though my brother thinks my octo is AWESOME, he doen't want a cuttle in the aquarium downstairs :( ...oh well, maybe the tank is too small even for ONE cuttle, let alone two. That's where I have the question. You earlier mentioned that cuttles should have a 200gallon aquarium...for one. Octopets says that two can be kept in a 125. Humph. So confusing!!! :?
     
  2. marinebio_guy

    marinebio_guy Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    It depends on what type of cuttlefish you get. I will tell you right now that a adult S. officinalis can grow almost a foot and a half. Some of the smaller species you could probably keep in your tank. Also cuttlefish usually do not go after sessile organisms.
     
  3. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Because officinalis gets so big i think that to be fair they really need as big a tank as possible and I STILL suggest a 200 US gals tank minimum.

    I have kept them from 12mm in length to adult size and beleive me, even one adult male in a 200 is pushing it sometimes if they ink!!!

    they can have the potential of 18 Inches and produce 3 times the ammonia of a fish of a similar mass and are much more sensitive to water pollutants as they have no scales and HUGE surface area of skin.

    I am not convinced the species should be on general sale
     
  4. cthulhu77

    cthulhu77 Titanites Supporter

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    Kind of on the side of caution also here...had planned to get some, then talked to Breese, who bred them before, and was convinced to just set up another octo tank...maybe they should just be for public aquaria...?
     
  5. oscar

    oscar Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    yeah but it would be such a shame for the people who are set up to look after them properly - the problem is the impulse buyer who isnt properly set up!! as opposed to cuttle enthusiasts who have done at least a year or twos research before attemping even a smaller variety-

    perhaps the problem would not be so pronounced if the vendors stop kiddng themselves about tank size and be a bit more responsible - i emailed them on the topic not really expecting a reply - and guess what no reply

    Also has an attempt been made to breed a smaller (even tropical so no chiller is required) variety - many australian varietys are around the 10-20cm ml mark and can live in warmer water happily living for a year to a year and a half!

    i am surprised about this case because they are good sites with good info and usually adequate warnings and condition info
     
  6. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Its still a new part of the hobby Oscar, and not always taken very seriously, i have lost count of the number of times there has been much hilarity in shops when i start talking octopuses etc. So, i dont think that the cephalopods are treated as much more than an oddball and therefore not given too much more consideration by the seller.

    AND when was the last time you seen a shop either online or your LFS, with signs on all their fish saying how big they can really get?

    Do other people's local shops still sell Pangassius, Arrowanna, Gymnothorax, Chiloscyllium, Ginglymostoma and so on? All of these can be giants, way bigger than cuttles.

    Anyway, someone who is dead keen and properly set up will be able to source just about anything they want so i dont think true enthusiasts will suffer. Both Myself and Greg will be able to testify that point with herptiles too.
     
  7. Scouse

    Scouse Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    Colin Wrote:
    Yep, im totally with you on that mate, dunno why people look down on them but dont upon people who want reefs. well i do, reefs etc are more money earners and people are small minded enough to not consider that people like different things. Time is money!!

    Sounds like you too have been with the wrong sorta women to me!!! :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  8. oscar

    oscar Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    haha

    anyway yeah i know what you mean collin - they just want to get them through quick i spose! still...

    i also know just what you mean about them being oddballs!! Everytime a lfs guy asks what i have in the tank and i mention that it is for a cuttle they laugh, scoff, or tell me its impossible or stupid!!! (not great for sales!! :? ) without knowing about it themselves!!!!!
    ill have to send them some pictures when i have set up!! lol :heee:

    btw what are herptiles?
     
  9. joel_ang

    joel_ang Architeuthis Registered

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    Plenty of arowana here, I even see 10cm sturgeons occasionally, i was tempted to get one once out of impulse, then remembered the size these guys could attain.

    Octos are still relatively easy to find here and its not uncommon to see 10 in one suppliers shop. Not as much cuttles now though, but more stained ceilings.

    200+gal is still best :)
     
  10. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    herptiles are reptiles and amphibians :)

    thats what i mainly keep
     
  11. oscar

    oscar Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    10 octos!!! wow i wish!!!

    :mrgreen:

    i get maybe 5 a year and there are no guarantees - anything from blue ringed (kept in a very small and open topped!!! container) didnt last long and neither did the fish in surrounding tanks but i was more worried about little kids sticking their hands in!!!

    oh rite - i never knew you kept reptiles and amphibians!!! - any salamanders??? or newts or mudpuppies or anything? - personally i would go for a chamealeon - but then again why wouldnt i go for the pet most difficult to get and keep!!! lol
     
  12. joel_ang

    joel_ang Architeuthis Registered

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    The octos were all kept in one tank in floating plastic containers with small holes to allow water to circulate. Larger ones like cyanea are kept in pet homes and put in another tank.

    I've got a veiled cham right now, they're definately easier than wild caught seahorses. I've got a phobia of amphibians and the only one i would dare touch would be poison arrows (if the opportunity arises).
     
  13. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Funny you should mention it
    Oscar... i post pics of them all the time in the supporters gallery LOL

    I have...

    Triturus marmoratus, 5
    T. pygmeus, 2
    T. alpestris alpestris, 4
    T. a. apuanus, 3
    T. cristatus (CB) 12
    T. carnifex 6
    T. vittatus 4
    Salamandra salamandra gallaica, 2
    Notophthalmus viridescens, 3
    Pleurodeles waltl, 4
    Pachytriton labiatus, 5
    Ambystoma mexicanum, 4
    Ambystoma mavortium, 4
    Tylototriton verrucosus, 10
    Paramesotriton caudopunctatus 4
    p. hongkongensis 4

    Thats just the Caudates :)
     
  14. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

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    Ihad to look up that word "caudate" - so I guess a frog would be a non-caudate. Looks like your collection is growing!

    Nancy
     
  15. oscar

    oscar Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    wow those are seriously cool! i did quick google searches on them all and i am impressed - i think ill stick with cephs though for now!!! lol

    i particularly liked the alpine newt!! any favourites?

    you must have a small cricket/insect farm going there!!! what do you feed them??? there are just so many!! i was glad to see a few in there i recognised so that i didnt feel like a complete idiot but we dont get anything like that in australia cept maybe in some specialty pet stores but even then...

    how many tanks??? i assume that what you keep them in

    once again - very cool! they were mostly terrestrial or amphibious? werent they? cept axolotls an that - do you go through the larval stage with the salamanders???
     
  16. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    oops hijacked thread!!!

    Hi nancy

    caudates are the tailed amphibians and anurans are the frogs and toads :)

    Oscar,

    i have a large compost heap at work where i am allowed to keep a large part of the collection and another compost heap at home in the garden. i mostly feed them earthworms and slugs. Crickets are rarely used as they are nowhere near as nutritional as live worms. But I always have some crickets for the frogs, so ocasionally a cricket may get thrown to a salamander.

    I am very interested in the Triturus genus and work with wild populations too. I am a licensed amphibian worker as part of my countryside ranger job. So as its winter here most of my triturus and the Salamandra are in their winter rest stage.

    i have about 80% of them aquatic. Its much easier to care for them in water and much easier to feed than when they are terrestrial. But, some of them like the juvenile marmoratus would easily drown if kept aquatically at this stage in their life so they are terrestrial just now, will encourage them to become aquatic next year.
    The sals are all terrestrial except Pleurodeles waltl.

    At least most of these live for 10 to 20 yrs unlike our cephy friends :)

    They are not all in tanks, the ones in my house are but i find that those large opaque holding boxes which are plastic and sold in DIY shops are great. Very cheap, secure lids and light enough to see through them. Especially good for when the newts are hibernating etc

    Cheers
    Colin
     
  17. oscar

    oscar Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    wow thanks for that - i have thought about keeping amphibians and that before but the licence is hard to get here and i wasnt sure what was involved - i would like to try frogs one day!!!

    i didnt know you could get metamorphised salamanders to live entirely in water - or do you jest feed in water? and have the enclosure half half?
     
  18. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Only certain salamanders in the water year round like Pleurodeles waltl... Salamandra would actually drown very quickly
     

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