Any more information as in images of these?

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by modelnut, Nov 6, 2011.

  1. modelnut

    modelnut O. vulgaris Registered

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  2. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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  3. modelnut

    modelnut O. vulgaris Registered

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    Thank you,

    But I saw that page years ago. It is very nice and there are a lot of stimulating images. But the sixth one down in the picture I posted is one that I have never seen before. Surely that is not the only image available online.

    - Leelan
     
  4. Cuddlycuttlefsh

    Cuddlycuttlefsh Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    Yeah.. and the 6th one does look different. Like a cross between an octopus and nautiluses. The arms are more muscular than the rest and do seem to be less in numbers.
     
  5. modelnut

    modelnut O. vulgaris Registered

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    It's the arrow-head shell that interests me. And what size is it? There is bugger-all on the web that I can find.

    - Leelan
     
  6. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Google "Gonioceras", another(?) arrowhead shaped shell. Terri has found a few fossils that probably represent these forms, see posts #85, 92, and 95, in This Thread.
     
  7. Cuddlycuttlefsh

    Cuddlycuttlefsh Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    Some theories ran through my mind after examining the shells. First of all was the shape of the shell for attracting females to mate with and for sexual reasons? Or was the shape of the shell formed for defensive behaviors. It would be a possible theory that these primitive cephalopods use their funnels to help them jerk back lunging it's sharp shell right at what ever was their target. If so it's purpose might also have been to ward of foes from behind and not just for buoyancy. Obviously their beak won't do so much against creatures bigger than it's size.

    :goofysca: :nautiloi:
    Oh please no don't!

    It must end this way
    brother!
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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  9. modelnut

    modelnut O. vulgaris Registered

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    Thank you! Still not much on the size. There was a reference to "nine feet" but a lot of species were listed immediately after including Gonioceras.

    I will keep this one in mind as I work on my first orthocone sculpture.

    - Leelan
     

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