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The cephalopods can hear you - BBC News

octobot

Robotic Staff
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#1

[SIZE=-2]BBC News[/SIZE]

The cephalopods can hear you
[SIZE=-1]BBC News, UK[/SIZE]
[SIZE=-1]The discovery resolves a century-long debate over whether cephalopods, the group of sea creatures that includes octopus, squid, cuttlefish and nautiluses, can hear sounds underwater. Compared to fish, octopus and squid do not appear to hear ...[/SIZE]


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ckeiser

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Oct 16, 2008
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#2
Wow, the implications for cephalopod behaviour research are staggering.

I doubt that sound sensitivity is used for communication as there is no evidence that they can create acoustical signals. However, it could clearly function in predator avoidance and locating prey.

Thanks for the link!
 

Nancy

Titanites
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#3
From what I can find out, at least some of human speech falls within the range that they can hear. So keep talking to your octopus :smile:

Nancy
 

kansas

Larval Mass
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Jun 16, 2009
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#4
dag gone, I was hoping to post this as my first contribution to the Tonmo community! lol. Ah well, good job on finding it!
 

monty

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#5
You've gotta be pretty quick on the draw to beat the Octobot... it's a ceph news machine (literally)...
 

DWhatley

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#6
Can someone give me an idea (using a common noise) to have an understanding of the frequency range? I am kind of assuming a low tone (I remember one member recently thinking his octopus could hear a particular music score but experiments did not confirm that the octo was reacting)
 

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