Reactions to noise/vibrations?

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by //////, Mar 30, 2011.

  1. //////

    ////// Larval Mass Registered

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    I'm looking into getting an Atlantic pygmy octopus (most likely, possibly a California two-spot, if available). I've already found a couple of threads on here about this, but the question wasn't really answered.

    Would noise or vibrations possibly be hazardous to their health? As in, I play the drums quite frequently. So I'm not sure how that would affect it. Or if it could get used to it.

    And I'm not really sure if this is the right place to ask, but is there anything that could be put underneath the aquarium (55 gallon) to reduce vibrations?

    Thanks.
     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Welcome to TONMO!

    First, a bimac (California two spot) is not a dwarf but a 55 should be fine for this medium sized species.

    As to your noise question, I am not sure we have a clear answer. Can you check the noise frequency of the drums. Relatively recently there have been news articles showing that octopuses CAN hear (this was thought not to be the case for a long time) at lower frequencies (400-1500 Hz).

    I had to stop doing laundry at night because it would drive my O. hummelincki crazy. His tank was on a wall shared with the washer, the spin cycle woke him up and he paced nervously anytime it was on at night when he would normally sleep. I did not notice a nervous reaction during normal waking hours.
     
  3. //////

    ////// Larval Mass Registered

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    Yeah I know that they aren't, but I'm most likely getting an Atlantic pygmy. Although I'd prefer the California two-spot. It just depends on what's available. That's what I meant to say.

    Thanks for replying. I previously had two puffer fish (yellow spotted) and noise didn't seem to affect them at all. The aquarium (10 gallon) was on a table across the room from the drums, and vibrations didn't really seem to get to it. If that makes sense.
     
  4. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    :welcome:

    I think you may be happier with a species other than Mercatoris, They are very reclusive and nocturnal normally add a huge tank to the mix and i fear you will never see it. I have 55g tank that I keep just for octos and so far my two favorites have been, A.Aculeatus(an Indonesian species), and O.Hummelinicki (Atlantic two-spot). I want a Bimac(pacific two-spot) but I dont have a chiller so I cant guarantee the cold temps they like.
     
  5. //////

    ////// Larval Mass Registered

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    Thanks again for replying.

    I was looking at the joubini. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Pygmy_Octopus

    It doesn't say if they're nocturnal or not. So I'm not really sure. Again, it depends on what's available. The store that I'm going to be getting it from usually buys from someone in Florida.

    And I found this site on frequencies of a few different instruments: http://terrydownsmusic.com/technotes/Frequencies/FREQ.HTM

    This is somewhat unrelated, but I've read that they get along well with (or at least tolerate) other things like urchins and starfish. What would be a decent number of each one? I'm only going to have one octopus in there (for now).
     
  6. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    Well, you can only keep one octopus in a tank with the only exception being merc's. All others will eat each other... even mating is risky. Case and point here... http://www.tonmo.com/forums/showthread.php?23440-It-is-a-tough-world-out-there-octopus-cannibalism

    As far as what can be kept with and how many... it depends on how big the tank is. I have one serpent star in my 55, 2 in my 50 along with a bat star and one sand sifter in my 40. For a 55 I would just say one would be a good idea until you know how much food is required to feed them.
     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    serpent and brittle stars are great tank mates and there is quite a selection if you go looking. They can be trained to take food from your hand if you care to work with them and on occassion some will have a bit of personality. Avoid the green ones though, as eventually, they will become aggressive. The only starfish (sea star :roll:) that has been reported as a possible problem is the Bahama star. The incident is anticdotal but worth noting. They are aggressive feeders and a young hummelincki was found trapped in a shell and being consumed by the Bahama. It is unknown if the apparantly heathly animal has simply died and the star was cleaning up or if the star was the cause of death. Starfish in general are difficult to feed and some difficult to acclimate. This does not hold true of the serpents and brittles though. I would avoid the sand sifters as very few survive more than a couple of months. I have several common Caribbean stars that have lived a number of years but they have shrunk in size and likely don't get enough to eat when there is little algae about (the serpents and brittles are meat eaters and live for years on the leftovers). I keep roughly one per 25/30 gallons of water in an octo tank but we do feed the tank additional meaty foods to be sure the serpents get enough to eat.

    Be careful with urchins and stay with ones that do not have sharp or easily broken spines. Pencils do well and I have them in most of my octo tanks (they are not reef safe and will eat soft corals and macro algaes if they don't find enough algae on the rocks). I don't keep pin cushions in with the octos but several people have/do and no one has reported a problem. Avoid the rock and long spined animals entirely (for an octo tank). I use roughly the same rule of thumb for the urchins as the serpents but will move them from tank to tank if I have the beginnings of an algae problem on the rock as they do a good job keeping it mowed. Do note that the pencils will happily consume coraline algae and I have used them to reduce it when my tanks have looked entirely purple.

    Another good critter to keep is a peppermint shrimp (no more than two though). Some learn to avoid octopuses (and some don't) but they will usually keep aptasia under control (they won't eat the larger ones but do consume the tiny ones). These shrimp will pack and attack so I don't recommend more than two but with two you will sometimes get a little free tank food when they spawn.

    Snails are another sometimes food item that are helpful to keep a tank clean as are a few hermits. I have found, however, that the blue legged hermits will kill some kinds of snails (but not all kinds) even if they have adequate shells. I have not seen this with the red legged variety and the red legged animals add a nice bit of color.

    You can also try a few sponges (it is generally acknowledged that the red ball sponge can cause a major pollution issue if it dies but I have had no problems with the yellow ball variety and it seems to do better than most in my tanks).
     

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