Nine Months for Ollie - Good News

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
#1
Hi all,

Ollie has been with me for nine months now! Happy Birthday, Ollie!

I believe she was around 3 or 4 months old when she arrived, so that makes her a year old, or even a little older. I'm really pleased she's still around and doing pretty well.

About a month ago, when I gave my last update, Ollie had laid eggs. Ollie has been less attentive to eggs recently (and they're probably infertile, anyway) and has paid much more attention to us. She plays tug of war, accepts food from the feeding stick, and even catches crabs. Insted of looking into the distance, she watches us in front of her tank now. She's started waving again, which is a good sign. Several times she's almost left her den, and I hope to eventually convince her to do that.

She is much less locked up in her den than a month ago. I've removed some rocks and shells, and Ollie has shoved out the walls to give herself more room. There is a window in front now (see pic) and a huge opening in the top of the den.

As far as Ollie's condition goes, it's pretty good. She still has good eyesight and coordination and her color hasn't faded. She has an irridescent green ring around her eyes, but it hasn't affected her eyesight.

So, I hope for a little more time with Ollie, which both of us can enjoy.

Nancy
 

corw314

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
#3
Happy Birthday to Ollie too!!! I am so glad to hear she is coming around again! I really believe we may have something here, with our theory of why they die in the wild, as to them surviving longer in our homes!!

Great Picture Nancy!!!

Carol
 

Me

Larval Mass
Registered
#7
Way to go Ollie!
(And Nancy :D )

I'm interested in hearing more about this theory. Why do the octos live longer in captivity after egg-laying?
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#8
Me said:
Way to go Ollie!
(And Nancy :D )

I'm interested in hearing more about this theory. Why do the octos live longer in captivity after egg-laying?
Well Me, I reckon it's because we take such good care of them! Both Carol and Nancy offered Ink & Ollie food in their dens (breakfast in bed no less!) plus there are no predators in their tanks to take advantage of their weakened state after the fast. Certainly Ink would never have survived in the wild since she lost her eyesight and more than a human bind octogenarian (sorry!) would.


Cheers J
 

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