Monitoring the Ocean with Cephalopods

Discussion in 'Marine Conservation' started by DWhatley, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Fish getting smaller as the oceans get warmer

    Short article in Practical Fishkeeping that summarizes findings that fish are getting small as oxygen decreases.

    I found several references to the study findings, this one in Science Daily but not an accessable copy of the study (published in the Sept 30, 2012 Nature Climate Change journal).

    What makes this a somewhat ceph related item is the findings Dr Gilly published about the Humboldt squid becoming smaller, breeding sooner and living shorter lives with the reduction in food supply. The summary article did not mention the other two observations or take into account food supply so the only exposed commonality is size reduction but It is significant to note that we think we are seeing animal size changes in a single life time.
     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Esterification of vertebrate like steroids in molluscs: A target of endocrine disruptors?

    Arnaud Giusti​, Célia Joaquim-Justo Aug 2013
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    Abstract

    Alterations of the reproductive organs of gastropod molluscs exposed to pollutants have been reported in natural populations for more than 40 years. In some cases these impacts have been linked to exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are known to induce adverse impacts on vertebrates, mainly by direct binding to steroid receptors or by altering hormone synthesis. Investigations on the mechanisms of action of endocrine disruptors in molluscs show that EDCs induce modifications of endogenous titres of androgens (e.g., testosterone, androstenedione) and oestrogens (e.g., 17ß-oestradiol). Alterations of the activity of enzymes related to steroid metabolism (i.e., cytochrome P450 aromatase, acyltransferases) are also often observed. In bivalves and gastropods, fatty acid esterification of steroids might constitute the major regulation of androgen and oestrogen homeostasis. The present review indicates that metabolism of steroid hormones to fatty acid esters might be a target of synthetic EDCs. Alterations of this process would impact the concentrations of free, potentially bioactive, form of steroids.
     
  3. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The effect of thermal processing and canning on cadmium and lead levels in California market squid: the role of metallothioneins A. Galitsopoulou, D. Georgantelis, M.G. Kontominas May 2013
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    Abstract

    The effects of two common seafood preparation practices (roasting and industrial canning) on the heavy metal content (Cd, Pb) of various tissues of California market squid were studied. Emphasis was placed on the role of metallothioneins (MT) in Cd and Pb behaviour during processing. Cadmium and lead analysis was conducted by a Zeeman GTA-AAS atomic absorption spectrometry system and MT analysis was performed by a mercury saturation assay. Results showed that Cd levels in the mantle and whole squid were considerably affected by both processing practices, reaching a 240% increase in mantle and a 40% increase in whole squid. Interestingly, Cd behaviour was associated to MT changes during squid processing. On the other hand, Pb content was not affected neither from processing or associated to MT content in the raw or processed squid. Therefore, processing operations may affect Cd and Pb content differently, due to the specific metal bioaccumulation and chemical features of each heavy metal type.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2014
  4. GPO87

    GPO87 Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    This is an excellent thread to start, D. Great thinking! I've recently started to consider the effect of ocean changes on cephalopod life, particularly as it pertains to acidification.
     
  5. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for posting these D!
     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Developmental and physiological challenges of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) early life stages under ocean warming

    Tiago Repolho,Miguel Baptista,Marta S. Pimentel,Gisela Dionísio,Katja Trübenbach,Vanessa M. Lopes,Ana Rita Lopes,Ricardo Calado,Mário Diniz,Rui Rosa
    2013

     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Interspecific and geographical variations of trace metal concentrations in cephalopods from Tunisian waters
    Moncef Rjeibi, Marc Metian, Tarek Hajji, Thierry Guyot, Rafika Ben Chaouacha-Chékir, Paco Bustamante 2014 (subscription)
     
  8. gjbarord

    gjbarord Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    I think there are some papers on the effect of changing oceans on cuttlebones that might actually increase growth rates, whether that's good or bad in the end, who knows...

    Greg
     
  9. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The future of cephalopod populations, fisheries, culture, and research in Europe Cephalopod biology and fisheries in Europe 2006 (full pdf)

    @gjbarord , you make me work too hard! I think this may be the article (or includes a summary of the study) you remember.
    It was probably worth the effort to find as it give an interesting case for using cephalopods to monitor climate change.

     
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  10. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Ocean acidification and temperature rise: effects on calcification during early development of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis
    Narimane Dorey, Frank Melzner, Sophie Martin, Franc¸ois Oberha¨nsli, Jean-Louis Teyssie, Paco Bustamante, Jean-Pierre Gattuso, Thomas Lacoue-Labarthe 2011 (full pdf)

    I believe this is the study @gjbarord mentioned

     
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  11. gjbarord

    gjbarord Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    Awesome D!!

    Greg
     
  12. Tintenfisch

    Tintenfisch Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Here's one for paper nautilus (Argonauta). We have plans to look at the hard parts of some other deep-sea squid from a similar angle later this year--stay tuned :)

    Argonauta at risk: dissolution and carbonate mineralogy of egg cases.

    Abstract. Cephalopods are champion mineralisers. Nautilids produce robust external shells and internal
    mineralised tissues; Spirula makes an internal chambered spiral; sepiids produce flat “cuttlebone;” some squids
    and octopus produce beaks and statoliths. Most cephalopod carbonate is aragonite, but one octopus is an
    exception: the female Argonauta secretes a fragile calcitic spiral egg-case. Three argonaut cases were collected
    in NSW, Australia. Four replicate pieces from each were immersed in seawater of varying pH: 8.1 (ambient),
    7.8, 7.6, 7.4, 7.1 and 6.7. Weight loss was measured after 14 days. Dissolution rate increased with decreasing
    pH, with less than 1% loss in 14 days at pH 7.8, 5% loss at pH 7.4, and 20% loss at pH 6.5. Carbonate from all
    treatments was analysed using x-ray diffractometry, showing no significant changes in mineralogy as shells
    dissolved. The pelagic life-habit of these cephalopods makes them particularly vulnerable to ocean
    acidification. Unlike an internal skeleton, which can be protected from seawater while still needed, the
    Argonauta egg case is exposed to sea water from inception. These egg cases, unprotected by mucous or
    epithelium, with high surface-area and low volume, and presumably without the capacity to adjust to a less
    soluble carbonate mineral, are exceptionally vulnerable to dissolution as ocean pH decreases.
     

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  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Seasonal patterns of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in digestive gland and arm of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from the Northwest Atlantic
    Miguel Semedo, Marta Oliveira, Filipa Gomes, Maria Armanda Reis-Henriques, Cristina Delerue-Matos, Simone Morais,
    Marta Ferreira 2014 (subscription)

     
  14. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Bizarre parasite may provide cuttlefish clues

    The article does NOT suggest this is the cause of the cuttlefish disappearing at Point Lowly but is more evidence that parasites can be used as biological evidence of prey items and where an animal has been.

     
  15. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Transmission distance of chemical cues from coral habitats: implications for marine larval settlement in context of reef degradation
    Dawit Yemane, Stephen P. Kirkman, John Kathena, Silvi E. N’siangango, Bjørn Erik Axelsen, Toufiek Samaai 2012

     
  16. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Projected near-future CO2 levels increase activity and alter defensive behaviours in the tropical squid Idiosepius pygmaeus
    Blake L. Spady,Sue-Ann Watson1,Tory J. Chase1,Philip L. Munday 2014 (full report)

     
  17. DarkwingedDuck

    DarkwingedDuck Blue Ring Registered

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    hey! that's my paper! :) ^^^
     
  18. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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  19. DarkwingedDuck

    DarkwingedDuck Blue Ring Registered

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    Cool, done...cheers!
     

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