Looking for info on a good skimmer for an octopus set up. Soon to be octo owner :)

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by Deadly_Evolutio, Dec 21, 2010.

  1. Deadly_Evolutio

    Deadly_Evolutio Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Hi, everyone as you can see I'm new here, but have been lurking around for a while reading, and reading and did I mention reading? For a very long while now (3 years) I've wanted an octopus, and I'm finally going to make this happen. Well soon, need to get the tank set up and cycled and everything before I make the next step.
    This will be my first saltwater tank ever, and I have been reading lots of threads from other new comers and the troubles and work required to properly provide for these amazing creatures. So I'm not "jumping" into something without doing my homework first. Of course there will be questions along the way that which is why I joined the forum to address them as they come along.
    Speaking of which brings up the question of this topic. I'm looking at protein skimmers and could you some real world and up to date info on what's a good choice for one. My budget is pretty open but I'd like to aim for $100-$200 range if that will properly fill the needs of course. From the research I've done, it "seem" that the needle wheel in sump skimmers are popular but which ones are good in that price range? Also my tank is not yet drilled for sump but I plan to make that happen to run a sump set up. Would also prefer something that is quiet, and has to fit in the specs of the inside of my tank stand : 46.38" W X 17" D X 27" H. I've been looking at skimmers with 2-3x my tank capacity.


    Since I'm on the topic, my tank is a 75 gallon (new) so no trace of copper. Ideally I'd like Bimac, but I hear they are hard to get now? What would be another alternative? O. vulgaris? Or do they get to large for my tank?
    Would also like to mention that before I get an octo, the tank is going to get cycled for at least 3 moths and will stock it live rock and fish to test out my tank maintenance ability and get it down before introducing any octo.

    Feel free to chime with any info.
     
  2. Jimmy55002000

    Jimmy55002000 Blue Ring Registered

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  3. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    Also... :welcome: to TONMO!
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    A 75 is still too small for a vulgaris but we rarely see them available. In the time I have been here only one has shown up (unintentionally, it was supposed to be a briareus) and required the keeper to up grad to a 130 (and keep her fingers crossed he would not out grow it). Although bimacs are not difficult to find, they are not legal to catch and sell (you can catch and eat or catch and put one in your tank but you can't sell it) in California, their primary US coastal habitat. The East Coast does not restrict octopuses so most come from the FL keys or from a number of places in Indonesia. There are two diurnal octopuses close in personality to the bimac, O. hummelincki and O.aculeatus. O.hummelincki is found in South FL and Haiti and O.aculeatus is shipped to the US. O. briareus is the most common we find for sale and is crepuscalar (early morning and early evening active) but they can range from almost fully diurnal to fully nocturnal in aquarium behavior. This year we have had a larger variety than most years and two that we could not identify clearly. Look at the top of the Journals and Photos forum for the List of Our Octopuses 20xx. The lists show the species, where they were acquired and from 2008 forward contain a link to the thread. Read, Read and did I mention Read?
     

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