Kermit & #2 - Octopus Bimaculoides Hatchlings

Woogiekids

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#1
Hello all,

Just thought I'd post a quick intro. I have two one week old Bimac inklets. A local reefer's Bimac had inklets.

Bimac #1 is doing great. Eating and social.



Bimac #2 is not eating. I don't have high hopes for him unfortunately.



Glad to be here!
 

Woogiekids

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#3
Right now they're just in a 5g holding tank. I would never find them again if they were in a big one! They're only about the size of a pencil eraser.

Once they grow, they will be in a species only. Well, two species only tanks, but I don't have high hopes for #2's long term prospects.
 

TMoct

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#4
Excellent -- what are you feeding (or trying to feed) them? What is the temperature of the tank? Both photos are amazingly cute.
 

DWhatley

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#6
:welcome: Woogiekids!

You might try a pipette with thawed frozen (not dried) cyclopees on #2 (Kermit may eat it as well). Gently squirt it near the mouth and on the suckers (on the suckers is important for "taste"). For #2 you can also try killing a shrimp and putting it in the mouth area (freshly killed, not frozen). I agree with the low chances but this species does better than any others we commonly try so it may be worth the effort.

With your permission, I would like to move this thread to our Raising Octopuses from Eggs forum in hopes that you will journal their progress.

Please consider editing your profile and putting something (city, state/province and country if out of the US is great but you can put anything and some member get rather creative) in the displayed location as it is not automatic. Having an idea of a member's location is particularly helpful with food suggestions but it also serves as a way to share local information and occasional mini-TONMOcon meet-ups.
 

Woogiekids

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#7
Thanks for the tips! I'll pick up some cyclops tomorrow and give it a try.

Feel free to move the thread, I'll keep it updated! I also added my location (San Diego) to my profile.
 

DWhatley

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#8
Shoot, I just saw that you said live brine not live shrimp. Brine is NOT a successful food for cephalopods hatchlings. If you can't get live small shore shrimp, glass shrimp (freshwater so don't put them in the salt tank) are a good alternative. You may have to kill them initially and had feed but they are likely able to handle the size of the smaller shrimp now. Adult brine have no nutritional value so they may eat it but they won't get fed. Even enriched they have been unsuccessful keeping cuttlefish hatchlings alive. I've not raised bimacs from hatchlings but have had a little success with O. mercatoris and O. briareus and the combination of shore shrimp and Cyclop-eeze were at least partially successful (both species resulted in adults that lived through full adults, the mercs successfully reproduced).
 

Woogiekids

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#9
Hmmm...I can get live mysis. I don't think they would able to eat the larger shrimp yet though? Even the smallest shrimp I think would be a bit too big? The inklets are about the size of a pencil eraser, probably smaller.
 

DWhatley

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#10
Just about ANYTHING is better than brine but I would suggest getting the larger FROZEN mysis and offering it on the end of a pipette. I went back to my journal for the O. briareus hatchlings looking for a picture of one of my little ones chomping down on a shrimp bigger than her mantle and decided to send you to the whole thread to scan. A lot won't be of interest but some of the feeding dialog may be useful. Only two survived from this batch so the rate was lousy, however, I have yet to find anyone that has been successful with ANY so I count myself very lucky. Ultimately, I mated the two survivors but the hatchlings did not live even a week.

We also have hatchling O. mercatoris currently being raised. iAlex has been a little lax in his documentation :roll: but has some excellent photos and a few notes on feeding. The link shows two hatchlings fighting over a shore shrimp.

Neither journal is specific to O. bimaculoides but you may still pickup some feeding ideas.
 

Woogiekids

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#11
I lost #2 last night :( I knew it was coming but aw man!

Kermit is doing great. I tried the frozen mysis this morning, but he wasn't going for it. I'll pick up some live mysis today and see how that goes!

Thanks for all the help!

Alissa
 

DWhatley

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#13
You might try gently squirting a little Cyclop-eeze on the edge of the shell/arms when you see him like this.
 

Joe-Ceph

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#14
I've kept several bimacs, but never tiny babies, however I've also kept strawberry anemone, which like tiny live food. if you can get out to where there is kelp floating on the surface, just sweep a fine net (or pillow case) through the water close to the kelp, and you'll come up with hundreds (or at least dozens) of little animals (probably copepods). Then you can us a course net to filter out the larger ones, leaving only the small ones. For a course filter, the craft store sells sheets of plastic with 1/8" or 1/16" sized squares (grid) used for counted cross stitch. You should be able to collect plenty of edible critters that are the right size, and are a natural, nutritious, native food for bimacs. You might even be able to freeze them (flat on a a piece of wax paper) and if they eat them alive, they might eat them thawed (worth a shot).
 

Woogiekids

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#15
Thanks for the ideas! I was coming on to post an update. I got a half dozen tiny hermits at the LFS today, and it took him ~3.5 seconds to grab one, lol. He's definately growing, and becoming more comfortable with me.

 

Woogiekids

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#18
Update: Kermit is 100% eating blue-legged hermit crabs at this point (you can see one in the pics below), and going through 2-3 a day. As that is a bit pricey at a buck a crab, it's time to make a concerted effort to move him to frozen, lol. He is approximately 1 month old, and you can see his eye spots starting to form.





 

Woogiekids

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#19
Kermit update! He was out hunting this morning for some hermit crabs (he's eating about 6 a day now...), and returned victorless to his shell. I gave him a piece of krill since I knew he was hungry, and he took it! Not sure if he's eating it or playing with it, but he's been holding it for about an hour.

Also, he inked today. Is that normal for an unstressed octo, or was something stressing him out? At least I think he inked. Maybe he pooped. It was a big BIG black blob, but didn't disperse in the water column.







 

DWhatley

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#20
What a little cutie!

Yes, that would be ink and in the form we call a pseudo-morph. It is quite thick and is usually easy to scoop out with a fine net. It is generally believed that this form of inking is to mislead a perceived predator while the animal takes off in another direction. The other form of inking produces a very thin ink that is much harder to remove and coats everything it lands on. Sometimes you will see both forms when they are startled. The quantity varies. I have had only one animal (hummelincki) that completely blackened her tank and suspect her own ink continued to frighten her (it can coat the gills and is a major problem if they ink in shipment). Fortunately, I had another tank available and could transfer her as I don't believe she would have survived. It took over a week to completely clear the tank. This is NOT common and I know of only on other reported incident (vulgaris). Normally the amount of ink is minimal, can be netted and a water change and the skimmer removes any problem. With your tiny, there is no issue and we do see the little ones appear to ink for no obvious reasons.

Poop will look like a skinny worm and sometimes thread like (I have only seen the thread elimination in older animals and have no idea what it means). I took a picture of "octopoop" and journaled it in my thread about my merc hatchlings. In this photo it is red because I feed the tank Cyclop-eeze and have found that octos either eat it (I know some do for sure) or eat the pods that eat it (or both). For other foods it looks similar but will be white or almost clear. Sometimes you may also see a white cloud that will look a lot like thin white ink. Again, I don't know why the elimination has these three forms but I have seen the first two in all animals I have kept.
 

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