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How to catch dwarf cuttlefish in wild

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#2
Welcome Alexandre! I can't help with suggestions on catching cuttlefish as I have not even tried to catch them in a tank but did want to welcome you to TONMO and to suggest, as I try to do for all new comers, that you edit your profile to include something about your location. This helps with animal and food sourcing suggestions as well as min-TONMOcon get togethers and in this case to be sure you are looking at cuttles and not squid :wink:
 

DWhatley

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#5
Alexandre,
What you are seeing are likely squid and not cuttlefish. The western hemisphere is devoid of cuttlefish (no one seems to know why) but we have a few squid that are often mistaken for them. I am not sure which species are native to Brazil but would guess something similar to the ones appearing to look like cuttles along the US East coast might be related. Here is a thread to review to see if they appear similar. Very few squid have been successfully kept in public aquariums (and fewer in home aquariums). There are a couple of dwarf species that have met with success (Euprymna scolopes - Hawaiian bobtail- and Idiosepius paradoxus - cold water pygmy - have a few posts). I made an unsuccessful attempt with a few Caribbean eggs a couple of years ago.

Large squid do not transport at all well and is likely much of the reason we don't get to see them in aquariums. Their best homes have been cylindrical rather than rectangular. I would suspect netting them will be your best bet but I would not take them out of the water. Instead, transfer them to a round bucket while they are still in the net in the water and then immediately take them home. Likely the finest net you can find will be the best to minimize damage.

OH, and PLEASE post your experience, good or bad. This is how we all learn.
 
Last edited:

Alexandre Ebrenz

Larval Mass
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Dec 31, 2013
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4
Location
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
#6
Ok. Thanks for the information. According to the pictures I think it is a squid. I didn't know that squids float like a helicopter similar to cuttlefish.

A friend of mine saw S. Officinalis in Angra dos Reis (a place 100 miles away) . He told me the animal was about 2 feet and changed colors.

I will try to order some S. Bandensis eggs.. I can't figure out another way..

For how long the eggs can resist during the shipment ?
 

DWhatley

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#7
Probably not S. Officinalis but there are about 300 known species of squid and some get at least that large.

Hopefully someone who has experimented with shipping bandensis eggs will have an idea on maximum shipping time. I keep octopuses and not cuttlefish so I have no experience with the eggs. Octopuses must be shipped overnight.
 

A. Cuttlefish

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Singapore
#8
Here in Singapore, some people build houses over the sea,.called "kelongs". I know a guy who would retrieve cuttlefish and squid stuck in his net, live, and either sell them to hobbyists or eat them
 

DWhatley

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#9
@A. Cuttlefish It is interesting that your acquaintance sells them to hobbyists even if only on occasion. Here calimari (squid, - pig vs pork, cow vs beef) is popular but most often seen in restaurants rather than cooked at home. There is not much of a food market for US octopuses (but I have seen O. briareus, a Caribbean species, advertised as a frozen food). I live on the Eastern coast (but not near the ocean) so most of my access is to Caribbean animals. These octopuses are often found in crab traps and killed to be used as bait rather than eaten. Occasionally, crabbers will bring animals that survive to the local fish collectors for sale or divers will bring them to local pet shops. There are no cuttlefish native to our hemisphere so all are imported, usually as eggs for the hobby and frozen for food.
 

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