How many species of Octopuses and Cuttlefishes in Indonesia

Polpessa

Cuttlefish
Registered
#3
I don't know the exact answer to your question but the online marine life database AKA 'Critter Log' for Lembeh Resort shows some of the species found specifically in Lembeh.

For octopus, it lists 10 different species of octopus but there are more ...
1.Algae (Abdopus aculeatus) 2.Blue-ring Hapalochlaena sp. and Hapalochlaena lunulata 3.Coconut (Amphioctopus marginata) 4.Hairy (Octopus sp) 5.Long-arm (ID unsure - Abdopus sp or Octopus sp2 or Macrotritopus defilippi?) 6.Mimic (Thaumoctopus mimicus) 7.Mototi or Poison Ocellate (Amphioctopus siamensis) 8.Reef or Day (Octopus cyanea) 9.Starry Night (Callistoctopus luteus) 10.Wunderpus (Wunderpus photogenicus).

Lembeh has at least 2 species of blue ring - H lunulata and an undescribed Hapalochlaena, and from my understanding the ID of the "long-arm" is unsure. There's also the Mosaic (Abdopus abaculus).

Cuttlefish:
1.Broadclub (S.latimanus) 2.Needle (S.aculeata) 3.Flamboyant (M.pfefferi) 4.Stumpy Spine or Dwarf (S.bandensis) 5./6. Undescribed Crinoid Cuttlefish & other (Sepia sp 1 & 2)

Here's the link to the Critter Log where you can search by latin name, English/common name, keyword, or Taxonomical order. It's a work in progress so suggestions / corrections are welcome:
http://www.lembehresort.com/critters.php

The book 'Reef Creature Identification' by Humann & DeLoach is also helpful as it lists many cephalopods specific to South East Asia including Indonesia and is fairly up to date (2010).
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#4
There is a 2013 update (3rd Revision) to Reef Creature Identification available but I was a bit disappointed in the new octopus info. It may contain more for cuttlefish and squid.

Oops, the 2013 Revision is for the Caribbean. Reef Creature Identification Tropical Pacific is still the 2010 version but Ned and Anna have been spending a lot of time photographing (I follow Anna on FB) there in recent years so a newer version may be in the works. Here is their BlennyWatcher Blog. They are pretty good at including cephs in most posts but the blog won't be an easy search for your questions (but good for images if you know the species). Anna maintains BlennyWatcher while Ned usually does their Marine Life Blog and is a bit slower to post but it is also a great place for photos. Note their usage restrictions. If you need images for educational purposes, contact them for permission.
 
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