bobtail squid

jkprules

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
May 20, 2007
Messages
19
#1
hey. im hoping to get my hands on a bobtail squid but i'm out on the east cost. anyone have a suggestion on how or where to get one?
 

gholland

Haliphron Atlanticus
Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2008
Messages
569
#4
Last I read in the archives, these guys had a crash and lost all of their bobtails. That was in 2005? Not sure if they ever started up again.
 

Braden_Thompson

Hatchling
Registered
Joined
Apr 24, 2009
Messages
3
#6
I have chatted with the owner of wetpetshawaii.com, and he has confirmed that he has seen them on night dives, and will collect them for $30 an animal, and for four, it will be around $130 for the four animals and shipping:)
 

Braden_Thompson

Hatchling
Registered
Joined
Apr 24, 2009
Messages
3
#7
Also, i contacted longarmlabs.com, and they aren't breeding cephs of any kind for a year or so due to some kind of financial issues, so go with the confirmed source, wetpetshawaii.com:old:
 

OB

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
3,086
#9
I would argue more strongly than that and ask anyone to refrain from, or at least spend some extra thought on collecting specimens from habitats as limited in their scope as the shallows surrounding Pacific Islands. Hawai may look big, but it's in a fragile balance. Moreover, more than 50% of the collected specimens are statistically not going to make it, so for every short lived spectacle in your tank, there will be an equal number of pointless and untimely deaths.
 

Octopus_Reef

O. vulgaris
Supporter
Joined
Oct 31, 2003
Messages
79
#10
ob;136475 said:
I would argue more strongly than that and ask anyone to refrain from, or at least spend some extra thought on collecting specimens from habitats as limited in their scope as the shallows surrounding Pacific Islands. Hawai may look big, but it's in a fragile balance. Moreover, more than 50% of the collected specimens are statistically not going to make it, so for every short lived spectacle in your tank, there will be an equal number of pointless and untimely deaths.

Well said, I have had these come as sub's before and NEVER had one arrive alive, Its best to leave them be IMO.
 

ckeiser

GPO
Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
Messages
120
#11
Well put, ob. A biologically and medically important species like Euprymna scolopes should be observed in its own habitat, incurring the least risk to an already fragile animal.
 

spinycheek

GPO
Registered
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
136
#12
What if you intend to breed them? Most of the labs that have bred them use cups and aerators which kind of points to them being fairly hardy animals, and if you intend to breed them, then they won't be a temporary tank decoration. Considering Hawaiians use them for bait and food, taking a few for an aquarium seems much less damaging. I also don't think it's any worse than taking any other animals from the wild. But I do agree, as with any animal purchase, lots of research and planning is the most responsible course of action as many species are threatened even though they aren't officially listed as such.
 

OB

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
3,086
#13
Spinycheek, captive bred is almost always a good idea, provided you have the expertise (which I assume you have, by the way)
 

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
19,352
Messages
201,857
Members
8,274
Latest member
Mcorbell

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak

About the Monty Awards
Top