biocube 29

Discussion in 'Tank Talk' started by darrendon, Nov 26, 2006.

  1. darrendon

    darrendon Larval Mass Registered

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    I've just started cycling a 29 gallon biocube which I want to eventually use for an octopus. I have about 1 1/2 inches of live sand, about 30 pounds of live rock in the tank, and about another 8 pounds live rock rubble in the filter (I used the live rock rubble to replace the bioballs the cube came with). I also added an extra bag of activated carbon.

    Two questions so far.

    First, the filter area in the back of the tank is very accessible from the tank -- there's about one inch of open space. Any ideas on how I can close off that avenue of escape?

    Second, I don't see where there is room to add a protein skimmer. Any thoughts on whether one is necessary and, if it is, any thoughts on where I can add one to an Oceanic Bio Cube 29?

    Thanks for any help you can offer.
     
  2. William Tyson

    William Tyson Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    do a search on reef central for a biocube protiene skimmer, there is a company that makes on that goes in the bioball chamber and it is apparently pretty good. you are going to be limited to a dewarf octo btw
     
  3. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Architeuthis Supporter

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    If you get a dwarf octopus in a 29 gallon with good filtration, I doubt you would need a skimmer. However, as someone who has a dwarf octo, I'd say go with dwarf cuttles instead. Unless you are usually up all night. That is the only time you will see it.
     
  4. DrBatty

    DrBatty GPO Supporter

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    i run a biocube 29 as a reef tank, and i can say one thing for sure.
    I know octos need good flow, but the return pump that comes stock is WAY too much for ANYTHING [had heaps of trouble with fish and corals alike in it due to extensive flow], and you'll find your octo won't want to be very active because he'll be blown all about the tank. I highly recommend replacing it with something half the strength.
    As for sealing areas off, velcro or astroturf should do the trick wherever you need. The adhesive won't stick, but I've found Gorilla glue is AMAZING if you have the patience to let it dry for 4-5 hours....I've used it in my 55 gallon octo tank, and even with water splashing everywhere, what you glue will stay in place. Good luck!
     
  5. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

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    Interesting to hear feedback on the Biocube - its made by Oceanic Systems and their tanks are usually very good.

    I looked at the 29 gallon Biocube at my LFS and they're quite attractive and self-contained. They seem to be a step up from cubes made by other manufacturers.

    Will (i need cuttle) has mentioned a protein skimmer now made for the biocube - supposed to work well.

    Do you have any other comments - do you think it would be good for corals?

    Nancy
     
  6. Indiana OCHO

    Indiana OCHO Blue Ring Registered

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    Panty hose and electric tape also work well to seal off areas of potential escape.
     
  7. DrBatty

    DrBatty GPO Supporter

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    For corals, it's a great system. The lighting is more than sufficient for almost anything you could want. The trio of lighting is definitely very appealing, particularly if you're interested in corals. Thus far, the only thing that's not doing as well as I'd like are mushrooms because the lighting is very strong. One of the guys at my lfs has the same setup as me and said that he replaced the white bulb with a 50/50 and said that it works better for all corals.
    The biocube as a whole is a great "plug and play" type system and I'd recommend it to anyone looking to get started quickly in corals/reef setups. The filtration sytem is sufficient, although I'm noticing the carbon filter next to the overflow can clog easily if you're not maintaining the tank regularly. For an advanced aquarist, you'll definitely find that there are some things that you'd like to change [we are all so particular...hehe], and the Biocube is definitely easy to customize to your liking. Most things are removable and changeable, which makes it a great base system if you're looking to set it up for something specific. They clearly thought out the schematic of the tank setup and it works pretty efficiently. :smile:
     
  8. darrendon

    darrendon Larval Mass Registered

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    Thanks for all the comments. I'd like to try to find that protein skimmer you recommended that is made to fit in a bio cube. What is "reef central?" or does anyone know who makes that skimmer or what it's called?
     
  9. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

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    Reef Central is a big site for reef keepers:
    www.reefcentral.com

    You may need to search in the morning or at odd times, because members have priority in the search and sometimes it's almost impossible to get to the search screen.

    Also, you could pm i need cuttle for further information.

    Nancy
     
  10. mister crabs

    mister crabs Larval Mass Registered

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  11. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    There is an alternate for about $23 (look up Fission nano-skimmer or goto: http://www.marineandreef.com/shoppro/fission_skimmer.htm ) but it may be the same as no skimmer at all. We haven't fully tried the one we bought (if you tell my husband I said he bought it because he thought it was cute he may disown me). It was temporarily set up in our nano cube while we were keeping our live sand alive for the octo tank but we really did not have anything to produce much protein in the aquarium. The collection filter did get a little dirty and it did produce bubbles during the two weeks it was running. We will be resetting up the nano this year as a Xenia and pipefish tank and will have a better idea on if it works in a few months but maybe someone else has actually put it to a test.
     
  12. dbarsotti

    dbarsotti Larval Mass Registered

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    biocube 29 skimmer upgrade

    So I just bought this biocube29 and I was some what skeptical due to the fact that I wasn't going to be able to run a large skimmer on it.. I heard the smaller skimmers that fit the tank don't work well so I figured I'd customize my cube... these pictures are after removing the bioballs and filter to make room for the skimmer & pump. I used a hack saw to cut the rear cover to fit the skimmer.. this is a AquaC skimmer.. I hope this helps all of you having trouble putting a skimmer on these tanks..

    the tank is a little foggy from all the new sand but its clearing up quickly..
     

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  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Your DIY with the skimmer already looks like it came that way, great job on the customization. If you want a slightly more finished look, fine grit sand paper and half an hour will make the edges look almost factory made.

    I wish our nano cube had a back opening on the hood!
     
  14. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

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    I have that skimmer on my small tank - it works quite well and is very quiet, at least after the break-in period!

    If you plan to keep a small octopus in that tank, be sure to seal off any opening - you could use duct tape or something more permanent.

    Nancy
     
  15. dbarsotti

    dbarsotti Larval Mass Registered

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    i'm planning on mostly keeping soft corals and maybe a few fish.. my girlfriend is obsessed with 'finding nemo' so maybe a pair of clownfish.. haha
     
  16. cephaloholic

    cephaloholic O. vulgaris Registered

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    I have the exact same tank and have an interesting idea. There is the coolest looking cephalopod that I saw in a pet store. It is a bobtail squid. It gets about 2 inches and I was hoping someone could tell me if this is an appropriate size tank. Also any other husbandry things i should know eg. feeding, diurnal/nondiurnal/,and if more than one can be kept safely together

    Thank You
     
  17. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

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    That's interesting; we rarely see those in the pet trade, although they're kept for research a lot... you might want to re-post this question somewhere a bit more visible, like make a new thread in cuttlefish care (I know a bobtail isn't a cuttlefish, but its needs are probably closer to cuttles than octos...)

    I suspect that a number of the pro researchers will be able to help a lot with this, since the Hawaiian bobtail Euprymna scolopes is frequently used in research. I think one member who lives in Hawaii kept one he caught himself for a little while, too, but I don't remember who it was, and I seem to remember that marinebio_guy or cuttlegirl may have been involved in keeping them in Hawaii at some point in a lab setting.

    My recollection is that they tend to be nocturnal, they bury themselves in sand during the day, and they otherwise have similar needs to small cuttles like bandensis but I'm sure others have a lot more details. They are often studied for their bioluminescence which comes from symbiotic bacteria in their light organs, which is an added niftiness that could make up for the nocturnal and shy aspects. Probably the usual things we say about nocturnal dwarf octos and lighting apply as well: red lights may be useful for seeing the animal being active without stressing it out... moonlights may be better for bobtails, because they use their ventral photophores to mask their silhouettes from below, so if you have moonlight levels and colors at night, they might give better light shows...
     
  18. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    I haven't kept bobtails (I imported S. officinalis for my research in Hawaii...). They are nocturnal and not as interactive as other cephs. They need a sand bed to bury and will spend most of their time buried during the day (leading to daily heart attacks while you search for them...).
     
  19. cephaloholic

    cephaloholic O. vulgaris Registered

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    I have looked through some ceph books and found that they do bury in the sand and like sea grass. i will put another thread in cuttlefish care.
    thank you for the advice.
     

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