why do octo's need 55 gallons?

nemo135

Blue Ring
Registered
#1
hello everyone on TONMO!!!!!i was just wondering why the some of the smaller species need 55 intead of like 20 or 30 and how i could make it so they couldnt get out of there tanks thanks,nemo135:lol:
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Hi and welcome to TONMO.com!:welcome:

You don't have to have a 55 gallon tank for a dwarf octopus, such as O. mercatoris. (However, these are nocturnal). These can live in a 30 gallon tank. Other members have had - and do have - other species of dwarfs, but it's just because their local fish stores happened to be carrying them at the time.

It's not so hard to make the tank escape proof. If you have a smaller tank, you most likely will not have a sump (smaller tank for your filtration equipment). You can make a lid out of acrylic or plastic screen, filling in any small openings with other materials such as duct tape. Look at the Tank Talk forum for examples.

Nancy
 

nemo135

Blue Ring
Registered
#3
Nancy;105459 said:
Hi and welcome to TONMO.com!:welcome:

You don't have to have a 55 gallon tank for a dwarf octopus, such as O. mercatoris. (However, these are nocturnal). These can live in a 30 gallon tank. Other members have had - and do have - other species of dwarfs, but it's just because their local fish stores happened to be carrying them at the time.

It's not so hard to make the tank escape proof. If you have a smaller tank, you most likely will not have a sump (smaller tank for your filtration equipment). You can make a lid out of acrylic or plastic screen, filling in any small openings with other materials such as duct tape. Look at the Tank Talk forum for examples.

Nancy
how big is a dwarf octopus???
 

shipposhack

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
#5
The aquapod will be fine, but you need to close off any areas that the octopus could get into. I can't remember exactly how big they get; I think mantle size about an inch or inch and a half full grown.
 

monty

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Supporter
#8
:welcome: Nemo135! Yeah, bimacs do well in 55 gallons, and I think that's OK for briareus as well. 55 would be too small for vulgaris, but for most other octos people see commonly, 55gal is fine. Some dwarf species can do well in smaller tanks, although one of the problems is that IDing these animals is tough, so it's not uncommon for a "dwarf" to turn out to grow a lot. I'm not sure if we've established that aculeatus needs 55 gallons, but experience has shown that it's better safe than sorry usually.

There are two main reasons why larger tanks are recommended for cephs: space and water quality. Some cephs grow rather large, and need space to jet around... large bimacs in smaller tanks run into walls a lot. The main issue, though, is that cephs produce a lot of waste. In a small tank, the biofiltration may not be able to keep up with the ammonia output of a ceph at all, and even if it can, there's far less margin for error if anything goes wrong, so it's very common for the water quality to get bad so rapidly that the ceph dies before the owner even realizes there is a problem. A tank with a lot of water volume changes more slowly, so it's less likely the ceph will die before a correction can be made. Of course, sumps and extra filtration can help with this, but it's generally been found that the survival rates of octos in large tanks is a lot higher.
 

shipposhack

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
#14
Yes, you can also do evaporative cooling. They will eat almost anything. Crustaceans (snails, hermits, fiddlers, and the like) are best for them. You can check the octopus availability thread at the top of this forum for online sources, or look around locally. You can usually special order an octopus in. When you do that you are rarely guaranteed the species that is listed, if the supplier decides to take a stab at IDing it at all. You need to have the tank running for 3+ months before you put your octopus in to make sure all the parameters are stable. The setup should run you about $1000 new, if you look around for used make sure no copper based medications were used in the tank because the copper will leach onto the glass, rock, and sand. If you decide to do a chiller, it will probably run you $250-500. The octopus shouldn't cost more than $80.

Hope I helped :)
 

nemo135

Blue Ring
Registered
#15
i know its kind of a dumb question but...........what makes it cost so much,if you could name what i didnt that would be great. . . . a tank filter and lights and stand 180-220$a skimmer about 160$ octopus from 40-80$ and live rock?????????????thats all i know
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
Supporter
#17
You can make a setup cheaper than $1000 but it just depends on the equipment you select. New or used, where you get the live rock, etc. If you have a local marine aquarium society you can get all the equipment and live rock you need much cheaper than buying it new at a store. Quality equipment is going to cost a lot of money. A good skimmer can cost $200+ brand new. Live rock can be ridiculously expensive at $7 or more per pound... 1-2 pounds per gallon of water. If you buy a well designed sump that can set you back another $200-$400, or you can build one MUCH cheaper.

Every octopus personality is different. Some will never ink and some will be shy/skiddish and ink often. The best way to deal with it is dim lighting and slow movement around the tank until the octopus adjusts to its surroundings.
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
Supporter
#19
A sump is another area for your tanks water to drain to, and then be returned with a pump. It adds to the overall water capacity of the system. In other words, a 30 gallon sump underneath a 75 gallon makes for a 105 gallon system. You can also run a skimmer, heater, or whatever other equipment will fit in the sump, so you don't have to have it all hanging on your tank. Makes it look much nicer, and makes it a lot easier to make a nicely sealed lid. This would also be an ideal place to run a fan to cool the water, since you aren't going to get a very good breeze over a tank with a sealed lid. A lot of people also section off a part of the sump to use as a refugium. A refugium is ideally a "refuge" for things that would be eaten in the display, like copepods (basically tiny saltwater bugs) and in addition keep a sandbed, some liverock, and macroalgae. The point of that is the macroalgae absorbs the nutrients out of the water that would otherwise build up and become toxic to fish, or in this case, an octopus. Of course there is no way to completely stop that, which is the point of water changes, and even still, the macroalgae needs to be pruned occasionally, like weeds in a flower bed. Otherwise it will eventually die and release all those nutrients it has absorbed back into the water.

Here is a really good link for further explanation:

http://www.melevsreef.com/what_sump.html
 

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