Which Msc?

Matt H

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#1
Hello, I feel I'm cheating a bit here as I've already introduced myself, although it has been some time since I last visited this tasty place and no other forum sections seem to fit the post.

I'm looking for a Masters course in marine biology, hopefully with some portion of it dedicated in some way to cephalopods and/or behavioural research. I've spent a while browsing the internet for these things but the majority of these degrees concentrate on broad ecology, management or economical approaches to marine biology that i don't really find interesting (whatever happened to science for the sake of it?!).

So far, the only places that catch my attention are Bangor (North Wales) and Auckland (New Zealand). Is there anyone here that knows either of those two or any others that are nice?

If it helps; I achieved an Upper Second in Marine Biology at Newcastle (in the UK, not Australia), did a month at the Seattle aquarium with Roland Anderson and have just done a month volunteering at the London aquarium. Also, I plan to go to Mexico in April with Global Visions International to do some coral reef surveys (and to learn to dive properly).

Any help whatsoever would be greatly appreciated :grin:

I hope I'm not repeating anything but a brief forum scan suggests I'm not.

Thankyou,

Matt :o)
 

marinebio_guy

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#3
Matt H;81575 said:
Hello, I feel I'm cheating a bit here as I've already introduced myself, although it has been some time since I last visited this tasty place and no other forum sections seem to fit the post.

I'm looking for a Masters course in marine biology, hopefully with some portion of it dedicated in some way to cephalopods and/or behavioural research. I've spent a while browsing the internet for these things but the majority of these degrees concentrate on broad ecology, management or economical approaches to marine biology that i don't really find interesting (whatever happened to science for the sake of it?!).

So far, the only places that catch my attention are Bangor (North Wales) and Auckland (New Zealand). Is there anyone here that knows either of those two or any others that are nice?

If it helps; I achieved an Upper Second in Marine Biology at Newcastle (in the UK, not Australia), did a month at the Seattle aquarium with Roland Anderson and have just done a month volunteering at the London aquarium. Also, I plan to go to Mexico in April with Global Visions International to do some coral reef surveys (and to learn to dive properly).

Any help whatsoever would be greatly appreciated :grin:

I hope I'm not repeating anything but a brief forum scan suggests I'm not.

Thankyou,

Matt :o)
Look up the marine biological laboratory at Woods Hole, a reseacher there by the name of Roger Hanlon does some behavior work.
 

monty

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Supporter
#4
marinebio_guy;81579 said:
Look up the marine biological laboratory at Woods Hole, a reseacher there by the mane of Roger Hanlon does some behavior work.
William Gilley at Stanford is interested in behavioral stuff, too, but I don't know if he's actively doing research in it... I know he's doing electrophysiology...
 

Steve O'Shea

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#7
Consider me 'called'.

It all depends how far you want to travel, Matt.

NZ is a lovely place, and we'd love to have you here, but it might be too far for you.
 

Matt H

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#8
Thanks for all your inputs!

Good point on travel distances. I really don't mind that much aside from the cost of living abroad. Seeing as the course is only one year, it might be a little over the top to go to NZ, but i'm still deciding on that.

I'm definately aiming for a career in research so if i get the chance to do a PhD, then I'll be highly likely to travel to more interesting places than here!

I've applied to the Bangor course, which really is my only decent option if I'm to stay in the UK, so i guess i'll see what they say...

thanks,

Matt :o)
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#9
Dr. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada, does work on cephalopod behavioural physiology with some quite recent publications. Her work mainly involves cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis. One of Dr. Adamo's Ph.D students, Alison J. King, last year did her thesis on "Coleoid Cephalopod Strategies for Powering Venous Return, Responding to Sudden Visual Stimuli and Regulating Male Agonistic Behaviour."

Dr. James Woods is another cephalopod biologist to come out of Dalhousie, and is a member of the TONMO.com community. He did a Ph.D under Dr. Ron O'Dor on the life history of Bathypolypus arcticus. He's now at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Science. (As a side not it looks like The Cephlopod Page has gotten a face lift! Looks great and there's an amazing video of an octopus escaping a box via a small hole. Exceptional resolution.)

As mentioned, Dr. Ron O'dor is another professor at Dalhousie who works with squid, including energentics, locomotion (jet propulsion), and tagging. His grad students have investigated other cephalopod topics. He's away (I'm pretty sure) right now working with the Census of Marine Life. I do believe he'll be back in two years.

Just thought I'd throw a little plug in for good ol'Dalhousie! Good luck and let us know what you find (some of us are planning similar routes in the years to come.)

Cheers!
 

cuttlegirl

Colossal Squid
Supporter
Registered
#11
main_board;82237 said:
Her work mainly involves cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis. One of Dr. Adamo's Ph.D students, Alison J. King, last year did her thesis on "Coleoid Cephalopod Strategies for Powering Venous Return, Responding to Sudden Visual Stimuli and Regulating Male Agonistic Behaviour."
:bugout: :bonk: Could you translate that into English for us?
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#12
Coleoid Cephalopod Strategies for Powering Venous Return, Responding to Sudden Visual Stimuli and Regulating Male Agonistic Behaviour."

Here's my attempt:
Strategies for 1) returning blood to the heart via veins, 2) responding to visual stimulus that appears suddenly out of no where, and 3) having some control over aggressive male-male interactions in all cephalopod species except nautilus!

*pant*...just....gotta....catch...my breath...*deep breath*

I have no idea if this is at all right, I haven't read anything from her thesis. But if was kind of fun trying to piece the mystery together. I think I'm ready for archaeology dig now!

Cheers!
 

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