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Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Phil, Apr 19, 2003.

  1. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Welcome to the new fossil discussion forum. Feel free to post your views and opinions and questions on ammonites, belemnites and other extinct cephalopods. If you have any theories you wish to discuss on biology, lifestyle or extinction, please post them here. I will do my best to answer any questions, or at least point you in the right direction. Enjoy!
     
  2. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Congratulations Phil,

    I look forward to many great discussions on this new part of the forums.

    Looks Like I have to post a little more to get out of my "Baby Bimac" stage

    :ammonite:
     
  3. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Cheers, Kevin.

    I knew I could rely on you!

    Personally, I'd like to be a larval mass indefinitely.
     
  4. Steve O'Shea

    Steve O'Shea Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Here's to posing you some terribly difficult questions now :mrgreen:

    Cheers & congrats
    O
     
  5. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Congrats from me too!!!!!

    Can't wait to think up a bogus thread for YOUR forum LOL


    ;)

    C
     
  6. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Help! Steve and Colin are out for vengeance! :twisted:

    Revenge is a dish that is best served cold, and it is very cold in the abyss! :)
     
  7. Tintenfisch

    Tintenfisch Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Haharr, let the fun begin!

    So, Phil, I heard that ammonites had a diagonally oriented structure within the body (that stayed at an exact 53.2 degree angle no matter how many somersaults they did) filled with some semi-buoyant fluid unknown to science at present. I also heard that they hunted in packs, linking together into a kind of Monster Truck formation with the 3m-diameter ones as 'wheels.'

    Thoughts? :twisted:
     
  8. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Yes, that's right.

    I believe at the 67th Annual PalaeoCephalo-Symposium at Leningrad last year, Prof. JF Lewis announced a sensational paper that late Albian Cretaceous heteromorph ammonites were, in fact, orientated at 57.4 degees, not 53.2 as you suggest. At least the orange ones were.

    Otherwise you are absolutely correct in your suppositions.
     
  9. Fujisawas Sake

    Fujisawas Sake Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Supporter Registered

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    Cheers Phil! :beer:

    Here's to fossils.... proving that death is only the beginning!

    Sushi and Sake.

    John
     
  10. WhiteKiboko

    WhiteKiboko Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    you mean like if dolemite was a ceph, how thick would his shell be?

    sorry, everytime you guys mention ammonites, rudy ray moore always pops into my head...
     
  11. GeoffC

    GeoffC Cuttlefish Registered

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    Not THE Prof. Lewis, Jerry to his friends??
     
  12. Fujisawas Sake

    Fujisawas Sake Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Supporter Registered

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    France would be proud! :lol:

    Sushi and Sake,

    John
     
  13. Hittite Chariotmaster

    Hittite Chariotmaster Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Under Suppiluliumas I (c. 1380-c. 1346 BC), The Great Hittite Museum of Fossils was created featuring a wide range of ammonite species as well as brachiopods, bivalves and a early Biblical jazz mag.
    Rumour has it that the design of the famous Hittite chariots were in fact based on some of these fossils, does phil have any idea which Chariot version was Fossil influenced or if indeed the Famed ammonite of UR still exists? :grad:
     
  14. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Ah, old Suppiluliumas the Bold, eh?

    Well, I can't really shed much light on Hittite warchariots being influenced by cephalopod shells, though it is clear that the Warrior Caste of ancient Mesopotamia certainly held the Ammonite indeep respect.

    As evidence of this I present to you the Golden Helmet of Ur unearthed by Baron Freiherr von Stein zu Lausnitz in 1928 during an excavation of the Kings Stables in Uruk.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Lindys

    Lindys Larval Mass Registered

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    Hi all. I am new to this forum. I have just returned home from a holiday on the Dorset coast with loads of fossils collected with the children from the beach. I have read that they should be soaked for seveal days to remove pyrite - so that is what they are doing at the moment. Will try to post some photos soon. Would anyone be able to help identify what we have, they are mostly amonite and belemnite, and does anyone have any advice as to what else should be done to preserve them? I hope this is not too stupid a question for you all but we all have to start somewhere.
     
  16. erich orser

    erich orser Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    First of all, welcome to Fossils and History, Lindys!

    There are no stupid questions, and you'll find a lot of terrific practical help here!

    :welcome: :ammonite: :belemnit:
     
  17. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Hi Lindy!

    Welcome to TONMO :welcome: Nice to have you here, and believe me, no question is too stupid!

    It'd be great if you could kindly post these pictures then we could have a stab at identifying them for you. Where did you go, Kimmeridge, Charmouth, Lyme Regis or somewhere else?

    It's hard to say what to do to preserve them without knowing their condition or rock they are preserved in. However, soaking them in water for a few days is a good idea as this allows any salts in the rock to dissolve, otherwise the crystals could dry out, expand and crack the surface of the fossil and slowly eat it away. The ammonites from my neck-of-the-woods (Folkestone) are often heavily pyritised and need to be coated to prevent oxygen decaying them. It may be an anathema to some, but I simply use modelling varnish to seal them and then put them in sealed boxes such as these available from UKGE. This also helps to protect them from knocks and drops too. Personally this technique has always worked for me though professional palaeontologists would probably balk at the prospect!

    You should be OK with belemnites as the guards are composed of calcite, an exceptionally tough material. They usually don't require any treatment at all.

    All the best, look forward to seeing your finds.

    Phil
     
  18. Coldcreation

    Coldcreation Larval Mass Registered

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    Hello all,

    This is my first post at this forum, which I found by doing a little research on ammonites and brachiopods in general.

    Specifically, I've been frequenting an area in Spain (Alto Tajo) for several years where fossils are somewhat known to be found (at least by the local population). So I set out to hunt some down.

    And hunt them down I did.

    Some areas, known to have been submerged underneath a shallow ocean some 210 - 160 million years ago have few, if any, fossils. Others are abundant in a variety of brachiopods, gastropods, cephalopods, pelecypods, etc.

    There are also locations deep inside shale stone hills (dated around 420 Ma old) abundant in graptolite fossils, as well as primitive fish, sponges and small shells and other things (?).

    Anyway, I look forward to reading some of the threads here and eventually participating in the discussions to further my knowledge on fossil history.

    I also look forward to sharing some of the photos of the numerous fossils (and there are many) I have uncovered in this remote region of Spain.


    More soon...


    Coldcreation
     
  19. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    :welcome:

    Looking forward to your posts and photos.
     
  20. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

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    :welcome: to TONMO!
     

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