[Video]: Sepioteuthis juveniles; 2 days +

Steve O'Shea

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Quite remarkable is that recently hatched (this morning) larvae (I'm running several systems) seem to tolerate a hexagonal tank (they don't like square/rectangular all that much).

I don't like experimenting with larvae, even though it is necessary to figure out how to keep these things alive, because it often results in instant death. As such, once a system is found that keeps them healthy I tend to stick with it (cylindrical tanks).

A hexagonal tank was handy, 5 larvae were placed into it (I've since added a protein skimmer, and removed the air stone), and all seemed quite ok; I'll leave them there for a day to see how things go.

The larvae are ather small (tiny in fact) compared to the ~ 30-day old juveniles, so look like little brown blips on the screen.





 

Colin

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might just be a natural instinct to eat everything else that moves regardless of species or size.. i think i would try putting in stuff to block some line of sight and provide distractions, i know that may mean more food to be added at more frequent intervals but that wont be bad..

how about cutting thin strips of plastic bags at 1cm wide and however deep the tank is and anchoring them to the bottom sortof kelp like??? that may provide a certain obstacle in the kill zone?
 

Jean

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Colin said:
might just be a natural instinct to eat everything else that moves regardless of species or size.. i think i would try putting in stuff to block some line of sight and provide distractions, i know that may mean more food to be added at more frequent intervals but that wont be bad..

how about cutting thin strips of plastic bags at 1cm wide and however deep the tank is and anchoring them to the bottom sortof kelp like??? that may provide a certain obstacle in the kill zone?
I think I agree Colin, although i'm sure stocking density plays a part. When we had hatchling Sepioloidea ( I know not really the same....but) they went cannibalistic but it continued even when the stocking densities were low.

The "kelp bags" might help, I wonder if "out of sight out of mind" applies to such ferocious little beggars?????????

J
 

Colin

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i'm 100% sure it does... my experience with sepia tells me that they may be full but seeing movement brings out the kill instinct and they attack... hence the bodies left behind. hungry squid wouldn't leave corpses.

my cuttles would attack each other during feeding, i put it down to overexcitement due to a feeding stimulus.. i lost two cuttles this way.
 

Steve O'Shea

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.... I'll give this a go (additional weed in there). You're right - if the bodies are only dismembered (not completely eaten), then it's not a food problem.

There's a small sacrificial sprat that's been swimmining around in that tank for the past few weeks. Every day I expect it to be 'gone', but they don't touch it (it's ~ 1.5 times their size, long, skinny and very silver). They don't like the glass shrimp (1 or 2 are eaten daily, in total, but they prefer the considerably smaller mysid shrimp, now considerably smaller than the squid themselves).

Jean, I've always wanted someone to look at tentacular club armature and diet. The three Sepioloidea species we get here (2 of them new species) have different tentacular club sucker armature. S. pacifica has the largest suckers (a few enlarged), and probably could take a 'colleague' squid (to eat), but those of the other two species are extremely small, and I wouldn't imagine that they were capable of restraining large prey (like a fellow squid).

It would be an exciting piece of work to look at diet and compare this to beak morphology, arm structure (relative lengths, sucker and/or hook morphology, protective membranes, photophores etc.) and tentacle structure, length, sucker and hook morphologies.

Jean, any chance any diver/vessel can get eggs of Sepioloidea right now is there?? I'd get a chiller unit shot down and pay for the same day courier to Auckland. I'd love to give these guys a go.
 

Jean

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Steve O'Shea said:
Jean, I've always wanted someone to look at tentacular club armature and diet. The three Sepioloidea species we get here (2 of them new species) have different tentacular club sucker armature. S. pacifica has the largest suckers (a few enlarged), and probably could take a 'colleague' squid (to eat), but those of the other two species are extremely small, and I wouldn't imagine that they were capable of restraining large prey (like a fellow squid).

It would be an exciting piece of work to look at diet and compare this to beak morphology, arm structure (relative lengths, sucker and/or hook morphology, protective membranes, photophores etc.) and tentacle structure, length, sucker and hook morphologies.

Jean, any chance any diver/vessel can get eggs of Sepioloidea right now is there?? I'd get a chiller unit shot down and pay for the same day courier to Auckland. I'd love to give these guys a go.

That would be a GREAT project! Our S. pacifica certainly cannibalised..we found beak bits in the gut contents!

I'll pm you re getting eggs!

J
 

tonmo

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no_fear1.jpg is an incredible photo!! They all are! Thanks for posting these...
 

fluffysquid

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During my latest Squidlab shifts (NRCC), I managed a few semi-decent shots of our young Sepioteuthis lessoniana.

This took quite some time, as their tank has a black background and not entirely adequate lighting for photography. Another thing, I have learned that there is a fraction of a second between the beginning of the flash and the actual taking of the picture! Often I had an excellent shot, but the squid became spooked and I only managed to catch him well on his way to the other side of the tank! Amazing the reaction time!

So, here are some shots for your comparing enjoyment of S. lessoniana and S. australis!





 

fluffysquid

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The first picture is only there because I liked the abundance of doooomed shrimp in the shot.
 

um...

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fluffysquid said:
The first picture is only there because I liked the abundance of doooomed shrimp in the shot.
:twisted:
 

tonmo

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fluffysquid said:
The first picture is only there because I liked the abundance of doooomed shrimp in the shot.
I just found my new desktop image :)
 

Steve O'Shea

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Fan-squidly-tastic! Yup, 'quite a bit' larger than ours; have been away for a couple of days so am about to go check whether they're alive/dead/have doubled in size or shrunk.....

How old do you think these are FS?
Ta muchly
Me
 

Steve O'Shea

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It's been so long since I posted on this thread. The squid juveniles are now pretty big, but the camera is awol so I can't provide pics. They hatched on/around 5 December 2003, so if anyone wants to do the arithmetic they can determine how old they are (>100 days is all I can do right now), and growing (and eating) furiously.

... to make matters worse .... an additional 2 clusters of eggs collected a week-or-so ago started to hatch today. The contrast between 1-day old and 100+-day old squid is amazing! Though I'm sitting here scratching my head thinking 'Oh no, here we go again'.

In a couple of nights (Thursday night, 7pm NZT) we're actually releasing ~ 50 of the 100+ day squid as I cannot procure enough food for them without spending 10 hours a day, and this is time that would better be spent on some other project (like catching and rearing other squid species). We've just been so successful with keeping this lot alive, basically zero mortality (other than the now rare cannibalism strike, or an animal that leaps from the top of the tank). I'll make sure we get pics of the release (will actually have a telly crew with us) - it makes a change, seeding the environment with squid, to plucking them from it with my little nets. About time I put some back.

I should add that we're working on squidcam as we speak/type, so very soon you'll be able to track the antics of the little guys yourselves. An update on this shortly.
O
 

Nancy

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Wonderful news! Glad you're having such success. Now that I've tried my hand at raising octo babies, I can appreciate even more what an achievement this is.

Nancy
 

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