Vampy

Phil

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
3,034
Reaction score
18
As far as know there is no such animal as 'V. diabolis'. In fact the only reference I have seen to this is on the back of the 'Incredible Suckers' video. I really have no idea where that came from and I'm 99.9% sure V. infernalis is the only species.

If anyone can show otherwise, I'll buy them a pint.
 

Vampyroteuthis

Cuttlefish
Registered
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
18
Reaction score
0
Well, when "Incredible Suckers" was made, was there already sinificant prior info about it? Perhaps it was first identified as "V. diabolis" and later its name was changed to "V. Infernalis"..

Just a guess
 

mucktopus

Haliphron Atlanticus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Messages
527
Reaction score
54
The name "V. diabolis" was an editorial mistake- those animals were infernalis. Brad Seibel has done a lot of work on these animals, describing their locmotion, physiology and some behavior. His papers will probably show up in Google Scholar.
 

Steve O'Shea

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
4,671
Reaction score
27
Phil said:
As far as know there is no such animal as 'V. diabolis'. In fact the only reference I have seen to this is on the back of the 'Incredible Suckers' video. I really have no idea where that came from and I'm 99.9% sure V. infernalis is the only species.

If anyone can show otherwise, I'll buy them a pint.
Pity you're so far away ... it'll be flat by the time I get to drink it (but then don't all you Brits drink your beer warm and flat?:yuck: ).

V. diabilis/bolis was invented for the camera, but that's not to say that there's only a single species of Vampyroteuthis. This one is nomen dubium, but it could be a good species nevertheless; I'm pretty sure that there'll be more than one species tied up in this. It would be nice for someone to do a Masters or PhD on the subject, looking at material from around the world (of which there is a lot).
 

Phil

TONMO Supporter
Registered
Joined
Nov 19, 2002
Messages
3,034
Reaction score
18
Steve,

As far as I understand, way back in 1946 Grace Pickford deduced there was just one species. Prior to that I have read that at least eleven species in eight genera had been tentatively identified, but Pickford determined that these forms were all misidentifications based on poor states of preservation of examined specimens.

However, to me it does seem remarkable that a genera with a world wide distribution in tropical and temperate waters is simply a single species, I would have thought that something so widespread would have displayed speciation, especially as individuals do not appear to be particularly mobile or capable of travelling great distances. Unless there is a continuous population band of interbreeding Vampyroteuthis circulating and connecting, across the globe, I don't see how the animal could not have speciated.

Mind you, I probably have no idea what I'm talking about!
 

Feelers

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Jul 10, 2005
Messages
332
Reaction score
0
I've always wondered how come no-one ever captures things like this alive? Say have a big cage with bait and a camera so you can close the door if you manage to get it inside, then very slowly bring it back up. Im geussing that pressure doesn't make a difference?

I'd love to see a vamp in a public aquarium, and wouldn't a live specimen be the best way to study this?
 

mucktopus

Haliphron Atlanticus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2003
Messages
527
Reaction score
54
ROV's have brought (and do occasionally bring) some up to be studied. With no gas space in their body, the pressure change doesn't phase them so much as the potential oxygen and temp shock (they live in the cold oxygen minimum layer), but those factors can be controlled for.
 

chrono_war01

Colossal Squid
Registered
Joined
Oct 7, 2004
Messages
2,580
Reaction score
4
Steve O said:
V. diabilis/bolis was invented for the camera, but that's not to say that there's only a single species of Vampyroteuthis. This one is nomen dubium, but it could be a good species nevertheless; I'm pretty sure that there'll be more than one species tied up in this. It would be nice for someone to do a Masters or PhD on the subject, looking at material from around the world (of which there is a lot).
So...there might be more than one single species? Does anyone one who is less stupid than me elaborate? I'm pretty sure that a sluggish swimmer in a enviroment that lacks oxygen is not really gonna do a big migration..no?
 

GPO87

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 6, 2005
Messages
818
Reaction score
197
Location
Dancing between Vancouver and Auckland
Steve O'Shea said:
but it could be a good species nevertheless; I'm pretty sure that there'll be more than one species tied up in this. It would be nice for someone to do a Masters or PhD on the subject, looking at material from around the world (of which there is a lot).
Hey that's right up my alley, I'd love to do a masters on the subject... just give me five years. I'm only a freshman in university at this time!:lol:
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
Joined
Feb 5, 2003
Messages
373
Reaction score
7
ME TOO! But the similarities don't stop there. I'm from London, Ont studying marine biology at DalHousie (with a future hope of working with cephs)! Actually, a good friend of mine is out in BC doing marine biology work as well. She's a first year too. She wants to do cetacean (whale) stuff though. Boring!

Cheers!
 

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
20,235
Messages
204,823
Members
8,893
Latest member
Going4broke2018

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak

About the Monty Awards

Top