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UV Sterilizer?

shipposhack

Haliphron Atlanticus
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Dec 16, 2005
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672
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Laie, Hawaii
#4
They are to kill parasites/pathagens in an aquarium. They are really good if you want to have sensitive fish, such as tangs. They will also help take care of algae blooms.
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
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Nov 19, 2002
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4,218
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Dunedin, New Zealand
#5
There are issues with inverts though. A local Paua (abalone)/rock lobster farm used them, with banjo filters so the larvae wouldn't be irradiated but they had real problems with mutations (mainly in the abalone) and increased moult death syndrome in the lobsters. All sorts of things were tested to no avail (including replacing all the brood stock) only when the UV filters were removed did the problem clear up. I have no idea what the mechanism is that caused these problems given that the larvae never went through the filters, but certainly it seemed to be an issue. They have had no problems since the filters were taken off.

J
 

shipposhack

Haliphron Atlanticus
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Laie, Hawaii
#7
Jean, would it be possible that the radiation was leaking into the water as it passed through? That seems like it would be the only way to cause problems. I have never heard of problems with adding one to any aquarium, maybe just skip out if you are planing on raising planktonic larvae.
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
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Dunedin, New Zealand
#8
shipposhack;125699 said:
Jean, would it be possible that the radiation was leaking into the water as it passed through? That seems like it would be the only way to cause problems. I have never heard of problems with adding one to any aquarium, maybe just skip out if you are planing on raising planktonic larvae.
that's always a possibility, we couldn't detect any leaks but I don't imagine it would take much. The lobsters were not planktonic larvae, they were a mix of newly settled juveniles, sub adults and adults!

There's quite a bit of research going on down here on the effect of UV on various larval forms (due to worries about the ozone hole!) and some seem sensitive to very low levels of UV, while others have substantial UV protectants

J
 

monty

TONMO Supporter
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Mar 8, 2004
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4,887
#9
Light leaks into the main aquarium could be an issue, but I'd be more concerned about the UV causing a chemical change in something small enough that it gets circulated through the UV section.
 

marinebio_guy

Vampyroteuthis
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Nov 22, 2004
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351
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Ocean Springs, Mississippi
#10
U.V. light will alter some chemicals and create harmful forms of some such as superoxide and others. Although, these should be in very small amounts but might be enough to harm a larvae (most animals have molecular defenses against radicals and other "bad" chemicals. The other thing is if the U.V. outlet is close to the water outlet on the tank the light can be reflected along the pipes and enter the main tank.
 

deep8

Pygmy Octopus
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Aug 23, 2008
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8
#12
Here is my opinion.

Keep the area in which your UV is completely black and isolated, keep the UV several feet away from your return to tank and the most important, do NOT setup the return of the UV directly back into the tank, make a loop to go back into the sump or refugium. This gives the proper time of the water to settle down of sorts. Marine bio guy is right, the UV will travel up the tubes just like fiber optics travel light. Create a loop to settle the UV light down.

I have found that the UV does more good then most think because if you change your water properly and often, you should be fine.

I have never seen a properly installed UV cause anything but good things especially if you have any type of algae blooms.

I always recommend a UV when setting up a new tank because if green hair algae gets hold, it can take much longer to get rid of then doing it right to begin with.

As some suggested, there might be some chemical changes, but if you keep your water changed properly, then it should never be an issue. I can only see this being an issue if regular water changes and improper placement is done.

I have used them for years now and they have always been great IF and I say IF, used properly. I do use one with my octo and it seems to be very successful.

Just my 2 cents worth.
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
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Dunedin, New Zealand
#13
It was an open flow through system....no need for water changes! The UV filtration was in a completely different room to the tanks. as all was well without it the company decided to ditch it and just go with their biofilters and sandfilters.
 

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