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tiny squid food??

robyn

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#1
Either I am an idiot, or there isn't a 'squid care' section (could also be both, I guess!), so I'll post this here and hope for the best.
Our lab has about 50 tiny, newly hatched squid (loligo?? I think, about 2-3 mm long, about 3 days old). We all have no idea what to feed them - the egg casing was at a pet store where one of the lab members was shopping and she picked it up.

Any suggestions? I am expecting to lose most if not all, but if we can find something to feed them that might help....


Thanks,

Robyn.
 

monty

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#2
robyn;96889 said:
Either I am an idiot, or there isn't a 'squid care' section (could also be both, I guess!), so I'll post this here and hope for the best.
Our lab has about 50 tiny, newly hatched squid (loligo?? I think, about 2-3 mm long, about 3 days old). We all have no idea what to feed them - the egg casing was at a pet store where one of the lab members was shopping and she picked it up.

Any suggestions? I am expecting to lose most if not all, but if we can find something to feed them that might help....


Thanks,

Robyn.
You're not an idiot, I think here's fine, although maybe either the "exotics" or the "physiology & biology" work, too. The best advice can probably come from Steve O and the NRCC folks... (I think Marinebio_guy and Greg B and maybe Fluffysquid have NRCC squid experience). Dr Gilly has raised squid, too, but almost never posts... he might be email or private message available, though.

The general rules seem to be: large cylindrical tank, lots of live food, expect cannibalism, good circulation (open system preferred), ill advised for hobbyist/home/pet care. That's all from memory, though, and just remembering reading stuff posted by experienced people. Steve and crew described their setup some in the "squidcam" and "squidcam II" threads. Unfortunately, Steve and Kat are both traveling, I'll try to remember to mention this post to Steve in Sarasota... he'll probably have valuable insight. Although maybe we should have a squid care section, I think most of the folks likely to help pay more attention to "Physiology and Biology," although obviously "ceph care" is more topically correct.
 

robyn

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#3
cool - thanks monty!

ill advised for hobbyist/home/pet care.
I agree - I was sad to see that a pet store would even try to sell the egg casing. I'll ask around here (I'm at the MBL in Woods Hole for the summer), as I suspect someone here will have some ideas. I'll keep you all posted.....
 

Jean

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#5
Squid will NEVER take dead food. They will eat several times their body weight at each meal. They do well on mysids for a start then move to larval fish. They can deal with prey (& in fact prefer to) 2-3 times their own size. The tank needs to be cylindrical and you should use a spray bar to get the water in. As Monty says, open systems are best. Try to keep the curious away, they have a huge startle reaction.

Good Luck

J
 

cuttlegirl

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#6
At MBL, try Dr. Joe DeGiorgis extension x7597 or he is supposedly located at LB-27. He works with squid... Good luck, my only suggestion is plankton tows, lots of them...
 

robyn

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#7
thanks everyone! I will try Dr Joe, thanks cuttlegirl. I have to admit that in a lab of hard-core neuro folks, the interest level in keeping these guys alive is pretty minimal - as the sole marine biologist I'll do my best..... It's so sad to see them all slowly dying in a tiny beaker but I have a feeling their days might be numbered....grrrr.
 

monty

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#8
robyn;96921 said:
thanks everyone! I will try Dr Joe, thanks cuttlegirl. I have to admit that in a lab of hard-core neuro folks, the interest level in keeping these guys alive is pretty minimal - as the sole marine biologist I'll do my best..... It's so sad to see them all slowly dying in a tiny beaker but I have a feeling their days might be numbered....grrrr.
Steve just said in his talk that he uses mysids 1 to 1.5 times the length of the hatchlings- they refuse smaller prey and dead food.
 

marinebio_guy

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#9
Baby squid are tough to raise. They are usually will not cannibalistic when young so that should not be a probelm at first. The NRCC was able to raise Lolligo opalescens which has hatchlings close to that size, but it is not an eazy task. I would use a circular tank as past post stated. Food will be your main problem, baby brine shrimp will be your best shot, feeding them 6-8 times a day.
 

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