Thinking about starting up a new cuttle tank

William Tyson

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#1
After 6 years of being Ceph-free I am thinking about getting back into it with a Sepia b tank. I would most likely get a bunch of 5-6 eggs and keep them in an 8 gal nano until they get big enough for my 40. Since it has been 7 years since I have kept them, I am wondering what the new trends are.

Thanks

Will
 

tonmo

Titanites
Staff member
Webmaster
Moderator
#2
:welcome: William! You'll get some good advice here on that endeavor. Good luck and thanks for joining.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#4
William,
For 99% of the successes, initial foods are live mysid. There are a few other successes scattered in the forums but not with anything as large as pods.

I wish I could offer more help but I am an octo keeper and have very little cuttle experience (primarily because of the first month of feeding). I will suggest that you consider putting breeders net inside the larger tank rather than using the small tank just for water quality and stability while they are developing. Anecdotally, PH swings seem to have a negative affect on the eggs.
 

magnetar68

O. vulgaris
Registered
#7
I just moved my 6 week old hatchlings to common shore shrimp (Palaemonetes Vulgaris). Both Sachs Aquaculture and LiveBrineShrimp.com sell them. It is much more substantial food and easier to keep than mysids. I probably could have moved them earlier, but the new hatchlings do very well on live mysids.
 

William Tyson

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#13
So its been a while, and i cant remember if the opaque eggs are the fertile ones or the translucent eggs are the fertile ones, as i transilluminated them with my iphone and couldnt really see any baby cuttles inside


*i do not know how old the eggs are though
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#14
If I understand it correctly, the opaque brown is an ink covering. As they age it get more transparent but I am not sure if this is simply from the stretching of the egg or because the ink starts to fade. The only reference I remember (keep in mind I am an octo, not a cuttle keeper) to egg fertility and the ink was a comment (I think by Cuttlegirl) that the early laid eggs were not as well coated and did not hatch or did not hatch as well as the later one.
 

cuttlegirl

Colossal Squid
Supporter
Registered
#15
If they are opaque and white, they are infertile (or dead), if they are transparent they could be fertile. Think of the white of a chicken egg when you are cooking it - it is transparent at first and then turns white and opaque.

It is sometimes hard to tell when the egg is so black. It will stretch and become more transparent closer to hatching.
 

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