Thinking about getting an octopus

Tentacle Toast

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...I wish these guys weren't so difficult to acquire; the more I read of them, the more I.like them (cold-tank requirements aside). On a completely unrelated note, how do you get a quote box around only desired parts of a post you wish to respond to?
 
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I've only kept bimacs, but from the reading I've done, I've always thought that for people that want a bimac, but don't want to deal with a chiller, an O. Hummelincki would make sense. They are slightly smaller than a bimac, warm water, and are reported to be diurnal and have great personalities. I understand they can also be purchased, at least at some times of year.

Rocks and sand:
If you go with a bimac, and chill the tank, I think you can use tropical "live rock" and sand. Tropical live-rock provides bio-filtration, although it will work at a slower rate than it would in warmer water. For that reason, you should use more of it (1.5 lbs per gallon?) and feed the tank less. I didn't think tropical live rock looked right in a Southern California Biotope tank, and I'm too cheap to pay for live rock, so I used native (non-porous) rock, which provides no bio-filtration. I use a wet/dry trickle filter, skimmer, and deep sand bed for bio-filtration. If you want to keep a lot of other cold water animals, most of which need to be fed a lot because they don't use light to make food like tropical animals do, then even 1.5 lbs of tropical life-rock per gallon is probably not enough bio-filtration to keep up with the mess made by all that feeding, so you would probably need to supplement the live rock with something else (like bio-balls) and have mechanical filtration, and an overlarge skimmer. I should also mention that the two bimacs that I've sent to Tonmo people, and were kept (I think) at room temp, with tropical live-rock, didn't do very well, and died early of (I think) unknown causes. I'm not drawing any conclusions, but one possible reason is that they caught some exotic disease or parasite from exposure to the tropical (exotic) live-rock and/or live sand. I'm not even saying that that's a likely cause, it's just one possibility to consider when thinking about keeping a bimac.

I like catching my own bimacs, and other tank inhabitants, but if I just wanted an octopus of any species, I'd try to get a Hummelincki and avoid the headache of a cold water tank, while retaining most, if not all, of the advantages of a bimac (personality, diurnal, moderate size)
 

Wafflez777

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Are there any requirements for the hummelinincki? I also need to know what temperature range suits them. I alsO have a question about oxygen levels, I don't get the oxygen thing that much, would an air pump for a bubbly treasure chest work, or do I need something fancy?
 
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You want to make sure that the water in your tank comes into physical contact with room air over a large surface area. In most tanks, that is done by keeping the top of the tank open to the air in the room, and making sure that the water in the tank circulates such that the water that is in contact with the air, is constantly replaced by water from lower in the tank. A large sump, with lots of surface area, is another way to go (since you will probably want to cover the octopus tank to prevent escape, which will also prevent fresh air from coming into contact with the water surface in the tank). If you rely on the surface area of your sump, be sure that fresh room air can circulate over the top of your sump (i.e.: don't enclose your sump in a stand unless the stand is well ventilated. It has been found that skimmers don't oxygenate water very much despite all the bubbles they produce. I've read that an air pump making bubbles works mostly by disturbing the surface of the water, and not so much because of the air coming out of the pump, and also that free bubbles, especially tiny bubbles in the water can collect inside the octopus's mantle, and cause health problems, so many of us avoid blowing bubbles into the tank, just in case that's true. I use a wet/dry trickle filter for filtration, which is designed to provide a massive amount of surface area between water and air, which supplies a lot of oxygen for the aerobic bacteria that it houses, and as a side effect, maximizes the amount of oxygen in the water for the octopus.

Even if the bubbles from a bubbly treasure chest don't hurt an octopus, it could sustain an eye injury from constantly rolling it's eyes in response to the bad taste exhibited by the choice of a bubbly treasure chest, so I would recommend against that. :roll:
 
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Wafflez777;194300 said:
Thanks Joe, I also would like to know the temperature range for the tank.
For temp range, I like to find out what the average surface water temperature is for each month of the year, where the octopus species is found wild. That will give you the natural temperature range for that animal. It's probably a bad idea to set your tank temp at the top or bottom of that range, since these temperatures are natural extremes, that are never endured for more than a month or so in the wild. For example, I keep a bimac from San Diego, where the average temp in Feb is 57, and in Aug is 68 (F), so I keep my tank at 60. The mid-point of the range would be 62.5, but I think a little cooler will slow down metabolism, and extend an octopus's life span, without being "too cold". The average monthly water temp along the south coast of Haiti (O. Hummelincki country) ranges between about 79 and 84 (F) during the year, so a tank temp of about 80-82 is probably about right for that species.
 

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