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The tragic fate of the Brighton octopus - Scientific American (blog)

octobot

Robotic Staff
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#1
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[SIZE=-2]Scientific American (blog)[/SIZE]
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The tragic fate of the Brighton octopus
[SIZE=-1]Scientific American (blog)[/SIZE]
[SIZE=-1]But as this new generation of octopus idols rises in the ranks of popular culture, we tend to ignore the cephalopod celebrities that came before them. This is the sad tale of one such pioneers, lest we forget the tragedies that can befall our most ...[/SIZE]
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DWhatley

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#2
The referenced 1875 pamphlet (The octopus: the "devil-fish" of fiction and of fact by Henry Lee) is a delightful read once you become accustomed to the old English. I have been looking for this text again for awhile as there is a suggested way to get them to release you and I forgot what his method entailed. You will be amazed at how much of the information in the book is still current thinking.
 

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