Tank information

Discussion in 'Cuttlefish Care' started by L8 2 RISE, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    Since I saw my first cuttle in an aquarium Ive always loved them :tongue:, but only recently have i discovered that they are available in the pet trade.:roflmao: Im hoping to get some s. bandesis eggs and grow them, and have been doing all I can to research.:read:

    Ive been trying to plan out how Im gonna care for them, and budget everything out. I have a 40 gallon tank which im gonna trade into an aquarium store for a
    55-70 or so gallon tank.

    I also have a five gallon tank which I hope to use to breed some type of fish or shrimp or crab or something to feed my cuttle every once in a while as I know it can be very expensive to go all live food so i want to go half frozen, half live.
    I wonder if anyone has any advice on what to do?

    But now for the real question:?:, a long while back, I had some goldfish in a ten gallon tank that had had gerbils in it before, all of the fish kept diing untill we asked a pet store worker why, he said it was because you cant put fish in a tank that has had other animals in it before. Well, my five gallon tank, although a fish tank with all of the supplies, has had a frog in it before, does this mean that I cant keep fish in it again either? I just dont see why you wouldnt be able to keep fish in a tank after youve kept another animal in it. Would someone like to clear things up for me please

    thanks,
    L8 2 RISE
    :goodbye:
     
  2. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Architeuthis Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2,364
    Likes Received:
    7
    Hi, welcome to TONMO.

    Others can answer your cuttle-specific questions, but as for used tanks go... it's always a better idea to use a new tank, because of all the things that could possibly have been used in the tank before you might or might not have forgotten about. If the little tank has been treated with any kind of "Ich" medication it is basically useless. A tank that small should be cheap to replace. The cuttle(s) you keep will determine what they will eat. You might offer "dead" food but that doesn't mean they will accept it. Be prepared to feed nothing but live items until you actually get them to eat raw/frozen foods. Some of them never accept dead foods.

    First things first, take your time. Patience goes a LONG ways in this hobby. You've come to the right place.
     
  3. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2002
    Messages:
    3,986
    Likes Received:
    6
    Newly hatched cuttles take a LOT of work to get them onto non-living prey items and could take as long as a couple of months. You should plan for live food only, initially

    welcome to TONMO.com
    Colin
     
  4. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    this live food would be mysids and arthopods(or something like that) right?
    and would it be possible to bread these to some extent?
     
  5. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,891
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    :welcome: When I have a moment, I will answer some of your questions...
     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,076
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Don't you WISH you had 8 arms about now (but NOT your newest cuddle - probably seems like eight stomachs though!)
     
  7. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,891
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    I never had any luck breeding mysids or shore shrimp. The cuttles eat mysids or pods for the first few weeks and then they can switch to shore shrimp. Mine would take frozen shrimp but I mainly fed mine live shrimp. I think it is healthier to feed them live food.

    I kept my shore shrimp in a large cooler with about two inches of salt water in the bottom of it.
     
  8. shipposhack

    shipposhack Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Laie, Hawaii
    Cuttles are even harder to get to eat frozen than octos are.

    I also think it is healthier to feed live (although very expensive at first and it will likely be all they accept for some time), and it will not contaminate your water if they go uneaten. It is cool to watch them hunt to; especially the babies catching little shrimp.

    Good luck
     
  9. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    I agree that its healthier for them to eat live food and that it's fun to watch, but Ive been doing some research and I cant see spending $60-$80 a week :bugout: on live food so Id like to mix it up and if at all possible breed the food for the animals
     
  10. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Architeuthis Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2,364
    Likes Received:
    7
    And now you know why so few people keep them.
     
  11. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    I know that it will probably be expensive to keep cuttlefish, and I expect that, but Im just looking for ways to lower these costs, at least a little. There are some beaches about 1-2 hrs away from where I live, which we go to often enough (not this time of year though :eek:) that have an abundance of mole and purse crabs, I wonder, would cuttlefish eat these? I know purse crabs are TINY (or rather Tiny), so would those work for baby cuttles?
     
  12. shipposhack

    shipposhack Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Laie, Hawaii
    I don't know about the purse crabs because I have never seen one, but you can try to compare one to a frozen mysid. If they are comparable sizes they might work, though a crab might be hard for the babies to break down and digest. You may be able to find copepods under the rocks there, and perhaps even mysids; Thales or Monty would be better to talk about his though (I believe they went hunting for them together if I remember the get-together thread right). If the cuttles could eat the crabs they might be a good source of calcium to help their cuttlebone to grow.

    You can't really short-change on the husbandry of cephs. You can wait until someone that raised from eggs has older ones available (I expect to sell some of mine in a few months), and feeding costs will be cheaper than newborns.
     
  13. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,891
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Is this what you mean by purse crab? I have found that cuttlefish usually prefer shrimp, but you could try to offer crabs as long as you have some shrimp just in case...
     

    Attached Files:

  14. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    yes, that looks like one, but I dont know how big that one is, most are the size of, if not a little smaller than a dime
     
  15. L8 2 RISE

    L8 2 RISE Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    4
    does anyone know if mole or purse crabs would be a good cuttle food
     
  16. Thales

    Thales Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Messages:
    2,996
    Likes Received:
    69
    Depends on age I would think. They will prolly be fine for anything but hatchlings. When I feed local crabs I remove the claws.
     
  17. Paradox

    Paradox Haliphron Atlanticus Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    720
    Likes Received:
    1
    For a group of 6-8 cuttles, it cost me about 35-40 dollars a week in mysids, then for one month olds, I paid 70 dollars for shore shrimp that lasted 2 weeks. At 1 months old, shore shrimp are so large for them that they wouldn't eat more then 1 a day. So for the first 1.5-2months, it was costing an average of 35$ a week for food.

    At 2-2.5 months, I was able to get them to start eating frozen. I will need to look for a good frozen shrimp to try for I have only been trying frozen shore shrimp, which were the ones that died in my shrimp tank.

    I haven't fed local caught crabs in a while just because I don't trust them. Especially since the recent oil spill in our bay. Plus its not as entertaining to watch a cuttle eat a crab compared to shrimp! When catching crabs, it lunges with all its tentacles open. For shrimp and fish, they shoot the feeders out. Even with small crabs, I never saw a cuttle go after one until they were at least a couple months old.
     
  18. Thales

    Thales Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Messages:
    2,996
    Likes Received:
    69
    IMO, having food delivered to your house is cheaper and more efficient than driving 1-2 hours.

    For hatchling bandensis, I know of no one successfully weaning them onto dead food. Somewhere between a month and two months is becomes doable. Until then, you need to give them live food, and that costs money because there is currently no cheap, 'proper' live feeds for saltwater animals (live brine is cheap, but a terrible food source). Currently, for the first week or two I bite the money bullet and buy live mysids - 500 costs me 80 bucks or so delivered. After that, I switch to locally collected amphipods (there are threads and pics in the cuttle care forum - do a search :grin: ). Raising live food is a real pain taking generally 3-4 times the water volume of the animal you are trying to feed. Culturing any animal is an effort in itself. If you want to become an expert in that, and have the resources, time and money to pull it off great. If not, you either need to live close to a source of live food (close because if the food animals you collected die, you need to replace them), and have the time and resources to keep them alive until you feed them. So, raising cuttles from the egg is expensive and time consuming. Sadly, that's just the way it is.

    Before I found an efficient way to collect amphipods, I collected tiny crabs. Tiny. Like 5 mm or less. A real pain, and the little cuttles didn't really go for them. Mysids just seem to work best. If you want to try any other live food, it has got to be as small as mysids for the first couple of weeks at least. You should see me sorting amphipods by size for the hatchlings - not all that fun.

    Daniel, I would use frozen Krill - which is my plan as well. Sometimes the heads are no longer attached and drawing eyes on them help get the cuttles to hit the feeding stick more readily. There may be another better source for marine feeder shrimp in the next year and I will tell you all about it if it happens.

    BTW, to avoid all this for people who want cuttles, if I don't have luck getting babies from my current batch, I am planning to raise and wean WC hatchlings onto dead food for sale and sell them when they are weaned.
     
  19. Brock Fluharty

    Brock Fluharty Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    511
    Likes Received:
    0
    =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =] =]
     

Share This Page