Sustainable Catch

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Articles discussing catch limits around the world
Population structure and reproductive dynamics of Octopus insularis (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) in a coastal reef environment along northeastern Brazil Françoise D. Lima,Tatiana S. Leite,Manuel Haimovici,Marcelo F. Nóbrega,Jorge E. Lins Oliveira 2013
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Abstract
Octopus insularis is the most important octopus commercially fished in northeastern Brazil. Its reproductive dynamics were studied in order to contribute to the biological basis for its management along Rio do Fogo, a small community in a partially protected marine area in northeastern Brazil. Overall, 1108 specimens were caught by the free diving fishery and experimental pot fishery, down to 15 m depths between November 2009 and September 2011. These specimens had their mantle length (ML) and body weight (BW) recorded. The gonads of 545 specimens were examined. The overall sex ratio did not differ from 1:1, but males were more frequent in the smaller ML classes whereas females were more frequent at over 90 mm ML. The ML (ML[SUB]50[/SUB]) and weight (W[SUB]50[/SUB]) at maturity were estimated to be 60.0 mm and 215.2 g in males, and 95.2 mm and 493.7 g in females. The peaks of maturation lasted for approximately three months and occurred at intervals of 7–10 months. Mean ML and gonadossomatic indices were strongly correlated with cycles of sea surface temperature and wind intensity. Octopods in all maturity stages were observed throughout the year; however, mature females were scarce, suggesting that they might migrate to spawn in deeper waters. Based on this study it is recommended that a minimum allowed catch size measure of around 500 g is implemented in the fishery in order to avoid catching both small mature males and maturing females, and that octopus fishing is restricted to depths of up to 15 m to avoid fishing mature spawning females. These restrictions could contribute to the sustainable exploitation of this stock that yields several hundred tons of octopuses each year.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#2
From the Ivory Tower Kitchen: Eight Lessons I Learned About Seafood Sustainability From An Octopus
Hari Pulapaka, Ph.D., C.E.C. Executive Chef & Co-Owner, Cress Restaurant, DeLand, FL 2013

A few days ago, I joined a small and selected group of chefs and culinarians from around the country as a 2013 Monterey Bay Seafood Watch Blue Ribbon Task Forceparticipant. The two day event hosted by The Monterey Bay Aquarium at The Carmel Valley Ranch engaged 20 individuals in an experiential meeting about ways in which chefs can influence positive change when it comes to issues related to the sustainability of our oceans and fisheries.

A memorable opportunity included a behind-the-scenes, up-close, and personal tour of the venerable Monterey Bay Aquarium. The highlight of my tour has been grounding and inspiring. I touched and was touched by a beautiful, female Giant Red Pacific Octopus. We were told by the handler and his young daughter that she was capable of recognizing humans by touch and could clearly demonstrate "personality". I can attest to that from my experience. This species is known to be short-lived for her size with only a three to five year life span. She was near a state of laying eggs (as many as one hundred thousand) which I learnt was also a prelude to the beginning of the end of her natural life (as in the wild she would die protecting her eggs). I assumed that she had a name, but she doesn't, so with her permission, I will call her Red Angel.

As a child growing up in Mumbai, I recall visiting the Taraporewalla Aquarium and every visit then gave me joy and left me amazed. However, my interaction with Red Angel has gifted me lessons which will lastingly guide my seafood choices and hopefully influence those of others. Collectively, we can turn the tide and restore the health of our oceans and fisheries, one thoughtful decision at a time. Positive change will not be guaranteed or quick. But, without our collective commitment, the Red Angels of our oceans don't stand a chance.

Here now are eight lessons I learnt from Red Angel. We must...

 

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