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Suggestions, please?

AprylWillis

GPO
Registered
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
112
#1
I'm thinking of introducing live plants to the aquarium. What sort of plants do some of the tonmo members have? Can you guys please give me some tips on some of the more beneficial plants? Also, what kind of other aquatic life have you guys successful placed with your octopus as a tank mate?


Thanks,
Apryl
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
Supporter
Joined
Sep 8, 2006
Messages
2,364
#3
We use caulerpa in our seahorse tanks, and it runs wild if we don't prune it weekly. The only problem with caulerpa is that sometimes it tends to die in large chunks and funks the water up pretty bad if not removed in time.
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
Messages
1,713
#5
A good LFS that caters to saltwater and reefs should carry a few varieties of macroalgae (Petco is not a good LFS). Keep in mind caulerpa is illegal in some states.
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
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Sep 8, 2006
Messages
2,364
#6
DHyslop;83690 said:
Keep in mind caulerpa is illegal in some states.
That doesn't surprise me considering how fast it grows. It overtakes EVERYTHING in our tanks.

Seacrop.com has some various macro. Really any website that sells saltwater stuff should have some.
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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1,713
#7
In 2000 the strain was found in the coast of California (U.S.A.), near San Diego, and also in the coast of New South Wales, Australia. The California invasion was small enough to be considered controllable: it was covered with tarpaulin which was held down with sandbags at the edges of the infestation. Then chlorine was poured in through tubes which fed into certain openings in the tarpaulin: the interior of the tarpaulin fills up with chlorine and kills living organisms inside it, including the killer algae but also fish and plants. The killing of such other organisms was not desirable but was deemed preferable to letting the weed grow unchecked, which would in the end yield greater havoc on these same creatures.

The invasion in the Californian coast was most probably caused by an aquarium owner improperly dumping the contents, allowing C. taxifolia to flow through a storm sewer into the lagoon where the invasion was discovered. California has since passed a law forbidding the possession, sale or transport of Caulerpa taxifolia within the state. There is also a federal law under the Noxious Weed Act forbidding interstate sale and transport of the aquarium strain Caulerpa.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caulerpa_taxifolia
 

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