Squid and ships

Tintenfisch

Architeuthis
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Guess I'll come out of hiding then :roll:

It is very unlikely, based on the length and thinness of Architeuthis' tentacles, that it could hold one alone out of the water. There is a remote possibility that the two 'zipped' together (more on this in a minute) could flail out of the water, but a) it would have to be in a very uncontrolled manner, and b) any adult Architeuthis at the surface will be dead or very close to it.
Regarding 'zipping,' functional evidence does point strongly toward it - the tentacles are flattened on the inner surface and each has alternating pairs of suckers and bumps that exactly match up with pairs on the other tentacle. They've got to be grabbing something, and since the suckers align exactly with the bumps, we're fairly confident that the tentacles do lock together.
Were a giant (or colossal) squid to mistake a boat for something else, and thereby be attracted to it, that 'something else' would probably have to be a conspecific - perceiving it as a whale should trigger a 'flee' instinct, and no recognized prey for either species would attain sufficient size to be confused with a boat - even for a squid with 20g of sneeze-for-brains. :) So I guess if we saw a male squid of superlative size making passes at a boat (after our initial duck for cover) we could consider the possibility of such cases of mistaken identity fueling sea serpent tales of yore...
 

Clem

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Kat,

Are you familliar with the strange case of the U.S.S.Stein? Check it out, if only to speculate. Something shredded the neoprene cover of the destroyer's sonar dome, leaving chitinous hooks behind. Perhaps a hook-armed squid, believing itself under attack by a booming odontocete?

:roll:

Clem
 

Tintenfisch

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I am only marginally familiar with the story (is there a link to it somewhere? Couldn't dig anything up on a cursory search) , but I have seen (low-res) images of the barbs that were left behind. They do not resemble any squid hooks / beaks currently recognized; their appearance is more similar to dorsal fin-ray spines or teeth from certain large fish species.
Not that I wouldn't like to see them first-hand... ;)
 

Clem

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Ahh, thanks Kat.

From what I know, the "hooks" couldn't be connected with any known species, fish or ceph. They were discovered when the Stein went into dry-dock in San Diego, following the failure of the sonar unit. It would be nice to think that they're gathering dust on a collection shelf, but they were probably discarded. I'll see what I can turn up, but I suspect the incident will remain in the "lore" category, alongside Octopus giganteus.

Yours truly,

Clem
 

Fujisawas Sake

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My :twocents:

*sigh* I still think that sea serpents are the ramblings of drunken seamen. To be honest, we humans tend to put images together when we can't really comprehend what it is we're seeing. Hate to take the wind out of the cryptozoological sails, but there's no real reason a squid would hang a tentacle out of the water just for some chap to point it out and say "Avast ye!"

Sea voyages of old were long, monotonous, and played tricks on the mind. Imagine looking out your window and seeing the same expanse for weeks at a time. Any sea beastie is suddenly going to look like a mosasaur, and if said beast looks at you funny, your mind is going to remember it as a fight to the death against a monster with ten heads and forty-one tentacles or something like that. Top that off with a wee bit of the spirit, and you'll have something that makes LSD look like pixy stix.

:boat:

Sashimi and Nori

John
 

Clem

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Fujisawas Sake said:
Top that off with a wee bit of the spirit, and you'll have something that makes LSD look like pixy stix.
Not that you would know.

Ahem.

:bugout:
 

cthulhu77

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Now,now...you don't believe that a basilisaurus (basilosaurus?) (sic?) lives in lake Michigan???? down here we have chupacabras (goat suckers)...they sell dried stingrays as skulls on the border towns to the tourists...I will take some pics next time I am down for you all...or maybe I will see a sea serpent off of Cholla Bay? :)
Greg
 

Clem

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cthulhu77 said:
Now,now...you don't believe that a basilisaurus (basilosaurus?) (sic?) lives in lake Michigan????
Ah yes, the old cryogenically-preserved saurian theory.

"See, here's what happened. The marine saurians survived the KT comet bombardment. They were trapped in glaciers by the Ice Age. Then , the Ice age ended, and the saurians thawed out. Local humans performed cardiac massage and used flint defibrillators..."

:roll:

Clem
 

cthulhu77

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You know that theory too??? Gosh! Actually, I think the basilosaurus (looked it up) is supposed to be a sort of primitive toothed whale...I know, I know...I like your version better, Clem! Still, would be neat to see...
 

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