Some Big Ones!

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Architeuthoceras, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    First pic is a large clam (Inoceramus), the hammer is about 33 cm long.

    Then there is this nice large Placenticeras syrtale, about 47 cm.

    While stepping back to take the next pic....
     

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  2. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    I almost stepped on this one. Another P. syrtale, over 50 cm. The next pic shows them both. From the Middle Santonian, about 85mya. The first one I think is the male dimorph, with the stronger ornamentation, and the other larger, smoother one the female dimorph.

    and finally a pic of the aspens turning gold.
     

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  3. neuropteris

    neuropteris GPO Registered

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    Very impressive! Are finds of that size common at that locality?

    Andy
     
  4. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Stunning Kevin. I just can't believe such large and fantastic specimens are just lying there exposed like that; I guess it's just what one is used to.

    Beautiful scenery too.
     
  5. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    As you can see in this photo, only the "orange" part was exposed, the largest peice of rock that was covering the phragmocone is to the right. I didnt have a brush with me so I just wiped it of with my hand. Ants had built a nest under the other side so when I lifted it the other side was fairly clean (seen in the first post).
    95% of the fossils in this formation are crushed or shattered so finding a good one is rare. On average there is a good fossil about every 2 miles along the outcrop.
    I replaced this one as I had found it and covered it up a little, I will return to collect it later as a few museums here are after me to get them some nice fossils like these. :smile:
     

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  6. erich orser

    erich orser Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Really beautiful finds, Kevin! Not to have you give away your exact location or anything, but could you give me a ballpark idea of where in the state you're digging? :ammonite:
     
  7. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    East-Central :wink:
     
  8. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    With the Fossils and History Forum being kinda slow lately, i think i'll post some old photos. I found this one back in '91, a large Placenticeras syrtale from the Mancos Shale. A B&W photo of it after preparation, and a picture of it in the museum at the local university (lower right).
     

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  9. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    My goodness, what a stunning specimen. Are all those in the museum yours Kevin?
     
  10. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes, those are all mine. The museum had an empty display case, so I filled it with cephalopod fossils. It was put on public display in 1995.

    BYU Earth Science Museum
    Press "start tour" then pick #7 for the best view, it also shows up in 5,6 and 8
     
  11. spartacus

    spartacus Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    Kevin, rootin' out them critters looks as easy as "cherching" for them here though here they're closer than 2 miles apart !

    Keef
     
  12. Sordes

    Sordes Wonderpus Registered

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    I live not far away from the Suebian Alps, an area which is very rich in marine fossils, I´ve even found nice ammonites and other fossil invertebrates in the forest only some hundred metres away from here. Some years ago an expressway was built some miles away, and there were really masses of fossils, mostly ammonites in all sizes, but many of them were as large as dinner plates or even a bit larger. I have still some of them, the largest ones have a diameter of about 40cm or more.
     
  13. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Wow! Would there be any chance of you showing us some of them please? I'm sure we'd all very much like to see them.
     
  14. erich orser

    erich orser Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    I second this! If you've got the shots, please share them! Sounds like an amazing find.
     
  15. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Yes, Cool, please try to post some pics. :cool:
     
  16. Sordes

    Sordes Wonderpus Registered

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    I have to look where they are, this was about ten years ago or even longer, some are not at me but at relatives. I´ll look if I will find something. About a half year ago I was again near this region where we once found the large ammonites, because there was again road works. I was searching for several hours, but the only intact fossil I found at this place was a small mollusc shell. But I found a sadly very damaged ammonite in a large block of stone which was about 40cm in diamter, and I believe it was even not complete.
    There are at some places in this region very much ammonites, and some spectacular fossils were found not far away from here, for example the ichthysaur-fossil with embryos from Holzmaden.
    I visit often the paleonthological and geological museum in Tübingen, a comparably small but very interesting museum, which contains several world-famous fossils. Here´s a link where you can see some pictures: http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/geo/gpi/sammlung/museum/pal.html
    When I visit it at the next time, I´ll made some pictures of the nice cephalopods, in general I am more interested in the exhibited vertebrates. They have also a really giant ammonite with a diameter of more than one metre, but I think it comes from the USA. They have also some wonderfull fossils of cephalopods which shows even the hooks of the arms, similar fossils are in the Löwentormuseum Stuttgart.
    I can still remember that I was once in France at a students-exchange and we made an excursion in a mountainous region. There were was a brook, and there were also many ammonites, some of them in the range of 20-30cm, perhaps bigger, but I could take only some smaller ones at home.
     
  17. Sordes

    Sordes Wonderpus Registered

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    I actually found two relics of those ammonites and uploaded them in the gallery. The larger one is not fully intact and has a diameter of more than 30cm, but I remember there were fragments I found which must have belonged to even larger specimens, but I can´t find them anymore.
    In fact the largest intact ones were probably not 40cm, but closer to 30cm, but it was more than a decade ago and I was still...well...smaller.
    Fossils of large ammonite aren´t very uncommon here and there are in fact also several complete fossils, for example in Tübingen, which are in fact in the 40cm range.
     
  18. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Sordes,

    Thanks for the information, link and photos of those excellent specimens. I apologise for not posting anything in reply in the last couple of days - you have not been forgotten - but I really have been exceptionally busy for once. (Work, application forms, beer festival etc). I promise to get back to you properly asap.

    Thanks again.

    Phil
     
  19. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    I led a field trip yesterday, we went out and collected this large ammonite I found back in '05. The first pic is wraping up all the pieces, the second shows the fossil in the hands of the State Paleontologist, Jim Kirkland. It will go on display at the Utah Geological Survey offices.
    The next pic shows some of the participants looking for fossils, and the last is a sign one of the kids had pinned to his pack, a future paleontologist for sure. :smile:
     

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  20. baldtankman

    baldtankman Wonderpus Supporter

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    Fantastic work!
     

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