small octopus ID

reefermadness9

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#1
I have been a long time lurker of tonmo, always fascinated with keeping an octopus. Unfortunately they are hard to come by in Nebraska. I was fortunate enough to pick up this little guy from a LFS under the vague description of Octopus Spp., so I am unsure of which species he is. I was conscious that species such as vulgaris are generally bigger than he is, so I didn't end up with a baby turning into a giant.

Sorry about the poor pictures, he's a little shy.



He is about the size of a quarter, I haven't seen him make any major color changes from brown. No visible eyespots found on the hummelincki/filosus (although his eyes show the same features), smooth skinned, he also doesnt have much for webbing in between legs (which are also very long and skinny).

Good news is he was eating at the LFS, and I was able to witness him eat a small hermit later the same evening I bought him. And ate last night as well. Seems to be nocturnal, although I have seen him eat in both daylight and low lighting.

An ID would be much appreciated, thanks! :notworth::notworth:
 

reefermadness9

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#3
Haha I know, my camera was stolen so I was forced to use a cell phone. I'm just a little desperate to get a positive ID so I can dial in parameters on the tank. Right now he is in a bad position to get a look at his eyes, I will have to catch him while he's out later and get back to you. Thanks.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#4
When you see him, try to estmate the arm to mantle ratio. All octos can show smooth skin and many show a brown coloring so not much help there :wink:. Skinny arms are not likely O.briareus but long arms are not likely to be O.mercatoris. The large eyes suggest nocturnal. If your LFS can find out where in the world he was collected, that will help some. If the arms are roughly 3 x the mantle length I would lean toward O.joubini as a wild guess from the limited information.
 

reefermadness9

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#5
Lengthwise, my estimate for the mantle to arm ratio would be something like 1:4 or 1:5. I just got a chance to check his pupils, didnt seem to have any dilation when I shined a flashlight.

I also googled O. joubini and saw a good resemblance to mine.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#6
Please post the link :grin: of the octo you found that looks similar. There a LOT of O.joubini's out there that are O.mercatoris (even from very reputable places). There has been major confusion on the common Caribbean dwarf for a long time (there is a nice PDF reference on clarifying O.joubini in the Cephalopod Species section but the arm ratio you are seeing would not be O.mercatoris so if it is a Caribbean dwarf it is LIKELY O.joubini (I currently have an unidentified dwarf from the Caribbean but your guy is NOT like Monty and what we know so far would fit O.joubini). Keep in mind this is only a preliminary guess based on minimal information :wink:
 

reefermadness9

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
#9
This octopus was in a critter keeper temporarily in my reef tank overnight. I left a piece of LR in it with a little sand and a powerhead pointed at the vents. I was careful to look for ways of escapement, the only possible way would have been through one of the vents, which are about 3/32 of an inch apart. I want to think hes just hiding really really really good in the rock, but I can't help but wonder if he got through the vents. Do you think that is possible for a small octopus with a mantle about as thick as you finger?
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
#10
I was careful to look for ways of escapement, the only possible way would have been through one of the vents, which are about 3/32 of an inch apart. Do you think that is possible for a small octopus with a mantle about as thick as you finger?
Yup. they are notorious for getting out of critter keepers. They can fit through an opening the size of there beak, roughly the size of their eye.
 

Members online

No members online now.