She laid eggs...

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by petromir, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hello Friends,

    my last thread here was about my octo which died after his arm decay. After that I set up a whole new 200L tank and bought another small indonesian reef species which is in the end the only one you can get here in Europe, beside Blue Ring, Wunderpus and Mimic. That octo is healtyh however 10 days after I purchased her she laid eggs which she is protecting under a stone. A few questions please

    1) How soon will she die?
    2) How about the eggs? Is it possible to raise the small ones?

    Thanks!

    Markus
     
  2. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    8,738
    Likes Received:
    516
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Sorry that happened - that's pretty fast. What do the eggs look like? Totally clear or are there black dots inside?
     
  3. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    South Florida
    Hard to say exactly,

    anything is possible, however not many people have been successful, but who knows you may be one of the lucky ones, so i encourage you to try it. octo eggs come in two sizes small and large. The large egged species have been much more successful than the small egged. food has always been one of the main issuses but with ever attempt we learn a little more. so first question is...

    how big are the eggs?
     
  4. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hi Friends,

    just see for yourself, the eggs are very small...
    And I can`t find the mother anymore...is she already dead?

    I have to check the whole tank again.

    Thanks for any advice.

    Markus
     

    Attached Files:

  5. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    South Florida
    strange the mother is absent, I'm not positive but i think the eggs need the mother to survive.
     
  6. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    Let's assume this is an Abdopus, probably aculeatus. Death usually comes within a week after the eggs have hatched. This means death occurs about a month after the eggs are laid.

    Roy
     
  7. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hello,

    the mother is there, I found her close to the eggs. Will the mother eat while she protects the eggs? I assume she will not, right? And any chance to raise the small ones?

    Thanks again.

    Markus
     
  8. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    She probably will not eat although brooding females will occasionally take and kill live prey.

    Unfortunately, there is almost no chance of rearing the young of a small egged species.

    Roy
     
  9. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Thanks to all for your answers!

    Today I was offered an octopus vulgaris from the Mediterranean Sea. I`m not sure about this one as they grow big...maybe too big.
    Anybody here who kept one?

    Thanks again!

    Markus
     
  10. CaptFish

    CaptFish Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    96
    Location:
    South Florida
    I have kept the Caribbean vulgaris, which grew huge. i had mine in a 120gallon and i still wonder if maybe it was too cramped.
     
  11. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    OK, this one will go into nearly 200 gallon. The octo will arrive next Tuesday, I will report. Attached is an image.

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  12. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,080
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Vulgaris are probably my favorite "can be kept in a home aquarium" species but the tank size is prohibitive for most and I have yet to keep one (maybe, Little Bit keeps looking and acting like a miniture). Your mediteranean version is larger than our vulgaris but octopus size varies considerably between individuals. Vulgaris are the only larger spieces that I am aware of that has been successfully kept in groups (for the purpose of raising them as food) with minimal animal inflicted deaths. From the for food studies (one where they made cages and stacked them fairly close together) the don't seem to need the roaming space of something like a Cyanea.

    Part 1 of the video I just posted in the Raising Octopus From Eggs forum shows the containers used to cultivate vulgaris. I can't seem to find the underwater cage technique but will continue looking and add to the cultivation thread

    Note that the videos in the Raising Octopus from Eggs forum will roughly apply to your female but that the species are quite different so age expectations, time to maturity, egg development time and size will be different but vulgaris is also a small egg species.
     
  13. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hi,

    she is still alive...does it occut that an octo survives laying eggs???
    Thanks

    Markus
     
  14. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,080
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Have the eggs hatched? They are likely fertile and the mother should live through the hatching but not much longer (a day to a week is common for most species). There is one South American species we are aware of that lays multiple clutches but this is the only one known to survive after the hatchlings are born.
     
  15. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Hi,

    the eggs are gone...but the octo is still alive. However it`s always sitting in the stone where the eggs have been. Let`s see what happens.

    Thanks

    Markus
     
  16. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    She is sitting in the stone all time, a few times a day you see an arm coming out, not intersted in food, but so far she is still alive. I assume she didn`t eat for a month now...

    Take care!

    Markus
     
  17. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,080
    Likes Received:
    1,126
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Most of my females came out on their last day or two and moved about the tank restlessly (similar to male senescence). I did have an O. mercatoris to live 11 weeks beyond hatching and we have seen a few of O. mercatoris live longer than other species after brooding (we have also seen them die within a day or two of hatching though) but that is the only species (other than the South American O. chierchiae, I mentioned that will lay multiple clutches) we have seen live considerably longer than hatching day (or the time eggs would have hatched for infertile eggs). In general, the smaller egg warm water species brood for 2-4 weeks where the larger egg warm water species may brood for 10 weeks, not eating most of that time (the Cold water animals brood longer, up to 3/4 of a year for some observed GPO's). Brooding time is not exact and is easily effected by water temperature but the mother almost always lives until the eggs hatch.

    I have questions about the not eating part that are not answered conclusively. One thing that bothers me is hydration. Since most saltwater animals obtain their fresh water from their food, I wonder why brooding females don't dehydrate (and maybe they do). The change in muscle is obvious so living off their own body fits the appearance change but I do wonder if they consume some of the eggs and/or small food (pods and anything you feed the tank like Cyclop-eeze) for water even though they don't eat (or mostly don't eat) during brooding. Keep in mind this is a question with conjecture and no clear observation. I have only had two species to successfully brood and produce live young so I have had limited observation opportunities but feel recording what you see and what comes to mind is important since the hobby is still quite young.
     
  18. petromir

    petromir Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2011
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    4
    Well, the octo came out today, but I assume to die. She is still alive but behaves lethargic and the skin looks blotchy...so it came as expected. Attached is an image.

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  19. New OctoDad

    New OctoDad Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is your octo still alive? or has it died?
    And did your eggs ever hatch? I'm curious. :)
     

Share This Page