Sensational new cephalopods from New Zealand(NORFANZ cruise)

Steve O'Shea

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Now this is rather sensational! It is a cranchiid squid (Family Cranchiidae), related to the colossal squid. The genus is most likely Taonius (these are all preliminary identifications, until we've had an opportunity to look at the animals in greater detail), but the species ...... ?
Note, the outer row of hooks on the tentacle club with a single cusp, but those of the inner row have two cusps (the resolution on the pic isn't that grand).

Taonius 3 is of spermatophores implanted into the mantle wall. This is probably what Mesonychoteuthis does also ... although we've not seen the mature Mrs colossal yet.





 

Jean

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:shock:

That is great! Those hooks are interesting, have you seen that arrangement (1 cusp, 2 cusp) before?

Love the fluoro pink ruler!

J
 

Steve O'Shea

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:band: Here's another. The FIRST record of Sepia from New Zealand waters :!:

It's a juvenile, but there's an :meso: out there somewhere.



 

Steve O'Shea

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.... and then there are these!!! This is a fully mature male Histioteuthis macrohista. The male's suckers are quite abnormal in structure ... I've only seen a few of these, and none quite like this one.

Anyone want to take a guess at what those suckers are doing?





 

Jean

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Bizzzzaaare!

Tell me Steve did you do paper in sadism 101?????? :lol:

Cos you're torturing me! I gotta work on &%$^$#^#% Stats and you're showing us cool stuff like this :D

I bet I'm not the only one who is totally jealous!

But don't stop posting the pics I got honours in Masochism :lol:

J
 

Clem

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Steve,

Jean's right, that Histioteuthis macrohista is really bizarre. The suckers look well suited for fixing onto slick surfaces; what's going on with the sprouts on the distal portion? They remind me of the surfaces of bristle-blocks.

Clem
 

Steve O'Shea

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Interesting eh! Those 'sprouts' are a form of secondary hectocotylisation - the suckers are quite modified (in addition to the others being swollen).

As far as I can ascertain, nothing remotely like this individual has been described elsewhere - it's something quite novel (even though there's at least one other specimen like it, albeit not quite so developed, in my old collections down at NIWA). I guess I'll make another trip down there in the not-too-distant future to refamiliarise myself with it.

Some species of Opisthoteuthis (Octopoda: Cirrata) develop aberrantly enlarged suckers at sexual maturity. I had thought that these suckers were used to lock the male's arms inside the female's mantle cavity, and perhaps acted as some sort of sperm/spermatophore reservoir. It followed that the same might apply with the Histioteuthis, and that these glandular structures acted like some sort of sperm/spermatophore reservoir .... except then we got the next specimen (pic attached), wherein the female's mantle appears to have been drilled by the male's penis, with the spermatophores implanted directly into her mantle wall (I'm not familiar with any description of a mated Histioteuthis like this either) and have commenced migrating their way through her mantle musculature (those white cylinders seen in cross section on image 3). If the male is directly using the penis to insert spermatophores into the mantle (as does Pholidoteuthis [into the mantle wall], and Architeuthis [into the female's arms]), then the suckers are unlikely to be used as sperm/spermatophore transfer organs.

Their glandular nature might indicate one of pheromone production and release, or possibly that the suckers have assumed a secondary luminescent function.... we'll not know until we see the brute alive. Perhaps a little histology would help answer this question.

See the attached female Histioteuthis pic.





 

Steve O'Shea

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... not yet; am still battling a few other squid, trying to identify them. I'll call in an expert on this one (C.C. Lu), as it's best to get it right first time than to have to correct it (or have someone else do it) later on.

There're problems almost everywhere when it comes to attaching a simple name to any deep-sea squid species - I'm just-about convinced that everything is new these days.
 

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