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Self-sustaining Ecosystem

skywindsurfer

Architeuthis
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Aug 13, 2009
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1,727
#1
Would it be possible to create a self-sustaining ecosystem large enough that could support a complete food chain long enough to keep a pair of medium sized large egged octopus(more then likely O. Briareus) through two complete life cycles? It would be a closed system with no sump. Water movement would be from large pumps beneath rock piles pressed against the walls/corners for water movement. Various macro algaes would litter a deep sand bed to aid in water purification, oxygenation, and removale of phosphates and nitrates. The rocks and algae will be there also as refuge for various animals in the food chain to gain shelter from predators and aid in reproduction. The tank will be void of any organisms capable of stinging, fish, or any large apex predators that could harm the octopus or damage their food supply. It will be completely an invertebrate only ecosystem. The entire system will be light by metal halides hung above. Water treatments(i.e. Ca+, trace elements, et cetra) will be given as needed.
 

skywindsurfer

Architeuthis
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Aug 13, 2009
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#2
Would a tank roughly 207" long x 157" wide x 48" tall half filled (approximately 3,362 gallons) be large enough to have an extensive variety of prey items living and reproducing inside of it while a singular octopus lives inside it with minimal interaction?
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
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#3
Considering GA's 6.3 million gallon aquarium still needs replacement water and feeding as does the flow through system at Seattles 120,000 aquarium, I would guess no.
 

skywindsurfer

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#4
True, but I don't think those tanks are ment to be self sustaining. I understand the reasons why water changes are necessary, but would it not be possible to have enough chemical and biological filtration to remove this process providing that you supplement things like Ca+, Trace Elements, and other things that may be depleted over time?
 

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