Sedona - O.mycropyrus

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Journals' started by SabrinaR, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    My bimac arrived today. Hes very feisty and keeps trying to escape.
    I have been trying to convince him that he like it there:octorun:, but so far no dice. Its going to be a long acclimation if I cant convince him to stay put... lol

    Take care if you order octopuses from this company. I will say the owner was very nice and helped me out with shipping and kept me up to date with all information. However he knows almost nothing about the care of octopuses and his transport leaves a lot to be desired. He is learning I guess but I personally prefer to work with people who know how to ship sensitive inverts so as to not need to worry if my octo got squished. I may be willing to order other things from him like LR or corals but fish and octos are out as far as I am concerned, at least for the time being.


    Update****

    I feel I need to explain further on the shipping method used for the octopuses I received. In the video I saw of the octos they appeared MUCH larger so I asked for the youngest one he had. First shipment had a baby octopuses no older than 2 weeks. There was a container poked with holes floating in water in the bag, however the octopus was not in the container but swimming around in the bag. I was surprised it didn't get smooshed by the cup.

    The second shipment was the same except this time the box was MUCH smaller and the containers lid had popped off and the octopus was not in the water! Apparently either the bag got flipped during shipping or she just didnt like the water... either way she wasn't in the water and I have no way of knowing how long she was out of it. I guess my displeasure of these shipments is I have ordered both from Live Aquaria and Tom and BOTH were flawlessly packaged.
    Now having said that, I am sure this guy is just learning and he was very nice about everything however I feel he needs to learn more about octopuses before I order from him again.

    I am just glad this little lady made the trip and she was much larger than the first one I received.
     
  2. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I thought this little guy/girl escaped but found that she prefers to be on the top of the critter carrier lid. After reading further in D's journal about the water flow I was thinking this had something to do with her current location so I tilted the carrier and power head more in her direction.

    I watched her for a while last night... She was quite adventurous searching her new home. I was surprised that she didnt escape into the main tank.
     
  3. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    Moved to first post.
     
  4. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I have decided on a name for the new 2nd octopus.... her name will be Sedona. If someone can change the title that would be great.
     
  5. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I tried to feed Sedona a frozen shrimp tonight. She took it and held it for a while. I thought she was actually going to eat it until 5 min later when I checked again and found that it was laying on the carrier floor. She has found a very nice hole in the underside of one of the rocks in her carrier to call home. Other than a few arms waving in the morning I really havent seen to much of her. I suppose she is still getting used to her new home.

    Because she is much bigger than Junior I put all of the tiny mysis shrimp in the main tank and started trying to feed Sedona small shore shrimp I got from the fish store. I will be putting a call into Paul come Monday to find out if he can help me locate very small fiddlers and or clams.
     
  6. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I went to go check on her late tonight and she was out. I put a live shrimp in there thinking she might eat it. I have no idea what happened but the shrimp was dead on the floor and she was on the rock watching me as I shined the flash light over the tank.

    I thought I read somewhere that bimacs are most active at morning and dusk? Am I mistaken with that? Or does it simply vary from one to the other? I am looking into getting red lighting for night viewing and hope to have something cheap assembled in the next few days.
     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Have you tried frozen hermits yet?

    All three of mine refused store bought table shrimp until about 4 months old (just guessing on Monty). We tried over and over but I think the meat may be too tough for them until they are older. They all seem to handle it fine now.
     
  8. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I tried a hermit yesterday but I crushed it and wasnt able to get the whole thing out lol. Huh thank you for that little tidbit about not eating table shrimp. I guess I need to get better at freezing and taking out those hermits from the shell. Practice makes perfect. I will try again tonight.
     
  9. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I picked up some clams and scallops on a half shell just to give it a try. HP would never take food from me so I really hope to have a better relationship with Sedona then HP. She was active late last night. She sleeps all day and is up late. I still havent gotten a good look at her though she is so small and my camera is so crappy who knows what I would be able to see.
     
  10. Joe-Ceph

    Joe-Ceph Haliphron Atlanticus Supporter

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    I find that bimacs (at least older ones) really like pieces of thawed frozen scallop meat, and I think they prefer it to shrimp by far. On Fridays and Saturdays, Costco sells thawed, previously frozen scallops from a display case by weight. You can buy as little as you want, and I find that my full grown bimac eats about 80 worthcents of scallop per week, so don't be afraid of the cost, or of needing to buy too much at once.
     
  11. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I am starting to wonder if my bimac isnt in fact a O. digueti. I obviously might be wrong. but the arm to mantle ratio just seems to be a little off. Not to mention that the mantel doesnt look as elongated as the bimacs I have seen. It looks more nubby and round. There is also the fact that she has only come out at night that leads me to this conclusion. I still dont have pictures as the only way to get pictures is to force her out.

    So I need some advice. Do bimacs which are just settling act nocturnal? Also how fast do bimacs grow.
     
  12. cephjedi

    cephjedi GPO Registered

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    No matter what kind of octopus you have, it will certainly take time to settle in and get acquainted. Almost all of my bimacs required between a week and two weeks to really get the hang of my schedule. Once they do, bimacs will remain highly diurnal.

    If your octopus isn't taking food readily, give it a day or two-or four. If your octopus still isn't eating after a week, get an appropriately sized fiddler crab or a crayfish. Once you get a good feeding response, you can experiment with various food items. My bimacs were fond of any shellfish, but refused any and all bony fish. After about a month, most of mine readily took grocery store shrimp from my hand.

    Also, don't jump the gun too much on trying to pin down an ID until the octopus does settle down and begin to act "normal." Right off the bat, I'd say if your octopus is trying to escape then it might not be a bimac. I've kept dozens of bimacs in completely lidless tanks and never had an escape.

    All octo's growth depends on two things: water temperature and food.

    Good Luck!
     
  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The hatchlings are harder to tell species and we don't have a lot of hatchling experiences. With the two O. briareus, their mantle to arm ratio did not match adult proportions until about 2 months. I have noted that my two species of hatchlings would stay hidden most of the time until about 5 months (Cassy and Tatanka are now waiting for their food at 4 months but still don't come out in the light). Both of the hatchling species I have kept were nocturnal or crepuscular though so I don't have any background in hatchling diurnals. Getting a color photo (I know how hard that is) will help to see the patterning and mantle colors. I don't think O. digueti shows the yellow dots that typify the bimacs. A couple of people have kept O. digueti and might be able to give an opinion.
     
  14. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    I think I may remember seeing yellow dots one night when I checked on her. Its possible that she just really hates the carrier. I put a few rocks in there for her but maybe its just not enough. I think I will put a few more rocks in there to help her feel more secure.

    Last night I fought the urge to keep checking on her. Every other night I would stay up a little later and look in on her. Once I saw her/she saw me she would dart to go hide and I wouldn't see her again for the night. I am hoping she will start to feel more secure soon.

    I ordered some fiddlers from Paul. They should be here either tomorrow or Friday. I hope she starts eating soon.
     
  15. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    It is most likely that it is very shy and will continue to be until it reaches a certain age. The "certain age" is not really known. With O. briareus I have guestimated that a 5 month old animal is more or less the optimum age where they will start to be seen. Now that I have a pair of hatchlings, I will get a better feel for this guess in another month or so :grin: but that will only apply to O.briareus.

    I wish we had better journals on Zyan Silver's hatchlings for you review but Carol did put a call out for keepers to report the status of these hatchlings and Brock's comments might be helpful. These hatchlings were born in early August.
     
  16. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    YAY!!! Shes eating! I clean out the carrier everyday and dump out all the poo and sand and food thats left... Well today I went and looked. The 2 shrimp I had put in there were dead, but one of them had been ripped apart and parts were missing! I am VERY happy about this. Thank you for the link... I will read up.
     
  17. Joe-Ceph

    Joe-Ceph Haliphron Atlanticus Supporter

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    Wait... What is happening to Sedona during this daily procedure? I would think that the daily trauma of being caught, or being in the keeper while it's being dumped out, would make it hard for her to conclude that her world is a safe stable place, and that she should start coming out more.

    Can you find a less disruptive way to clean the enclosure, like using a net and/or a siphon to suck out the junk?
     
  18. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    What normally happens is she is hiding on the underside of her rock. I take out the shrimp left overs and then rock (she stays on the rock the whole time and is then placed on the sand bottom of the main tank) and then I dump the empty carrier. I never handle her just the rock nor do I try to catch her. Do you think this is bad? Today the carrier wasn't very dirty so I just took out the shrimp and left everything as it was. Maybe a hose would be a better idea though.
     
  19. SabrinaR

    SabrinaR Larger Pacific Striped Octopus Registered

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    AH! I came up with a better way... at least I think so. I can put a hermit crab in the carrier. That way if she wants to eat it she can and either way it cleans up the poo. Let me know what you think of this idea. I have never had such a small octo before and I dont normally use the carrier. First time user here. Thank you for your suggestion Joe-Ceph I would have just kept doing it and then wondered why she wasn't coming out.
     
  20. Joe-Ceph

    Joe-Ceph Haliphron Atlanticus Supporter

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    Your plan certainly won't hurt, and will probably help, but you don't want hermit crab poo building up any more than you want octop poo to. What about letting water flow do most of the work? What if you fed a hose into the carrier, through a tight fitting hole, and continuously ran a small powerhead outside the carrier, connected to the hose,? The idea is to continuously blow "clean" tank water into the carrier at a rate that is just fast enough to pickup and keep particles of poo and small food scraps suspended in the water, where they will eventually flow out of the carrier. Any pieces that are too big and heavy can be eaten by either your octopus or hermit crab, and the hermit crab poo should be small enough to blow away and not collect in the carrier. The environment and water chemistry in the carrier would be as clean and stable as in the big tank, and your little octo wouldn't have to endure daily alien abduction or the subsequent PTSD. If the smallest powerhead you can find creates too much flow, you can drill small holes in the tubing, before it enters the carrier, which will let some of the water, and pressure, escape before it goes into the carrier. Drill as many as you need to knock the flow down below gale force, but still fast enough to kick up all the poo so nothing can settle on the bottom.

    If you decide to drill a hole in the carrier, or its lid, to get the hose in, be sure to back up the thin plastic with a flat piece of junk wood when you drill, so that the drill bit pushes through the plastic and immediately into the wood. Press the wood and plastic tightly together so neither one can shift or spin during the drilling. If you don't, the plastic is much more likely to crack, or chip during drilling. I suspect that sandwiching the plastic wall of the carrier, or lid, tightly between two pieces of wood would be even better, especially for thin plastic. This trick has worked very well for me when drilling 1/8" - 3/16" acrylic.
     

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