Rubbermaid sump

Illithid

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#2
Been there, done that :wink:

http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/5717/

I would suggest using bulkhead fittings, not the sealing rings like I did. I got the best ones on ebay and they even cost less too.

I would go with a cheap vivarium or petsmart tank instead. I know it costs more and I did mine to save money, but it wasn't worth the hassle and possible expense later on if it leaks. I would DEFINITELY do a DIY system if you have the knowledge, but glass is easier to bulkhead and seal than rubbermaid. If you use a submersible pump and have only one big tub and others nested in it -they would work fine.

My system has been up and running fine for 8 months. I had a water problem, but that was a dropped skimmer output hose and would have happened with anyone's tank (don't tell your significant other that though :mrgreen: .)
 

marinebio_guy

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#3
It would be about the same as building any other sump. Just make sure you clean it well, also put water in it and let it sit there for a couple of days then wash it and repeat one more time this is because there might be some residual chemical leeching
 

DrBatty

GPO
Supporter
#4
Rubbermaids are cool, but please be aware that they can buckle considerably if you put a lot of water in them [learned this one the hard way... :mad: ]
It really is best to use a cheap glass tank from a vivarium or pet shop....they are a bit more expensive, but they'll last a lot longer and you won't have to worry about them buckling or leaking, as said before..Just my two cents :smile:
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
Supporter
#5
Using an aquarium also means you don't have to worry about chemical coatings on the plastic and you can always see what the water level is. It makes it easier to put baffles in, too.

Dan
 

superwaterguy52

Blue Ring
Registered
#6
Ok, I guess I was getting a little ahead of myself, because I have no clue as to what some of you guys are talking about. First of all, what did you mean by "buckle", DrBatty? And what are baffles? And what are bulkheads and what is a DIY system? I guess what I need to know is, what are all the things that you need in a sump, and what do they do?
 

DrBatty

GPO
Supporter
#7
superwaterguy52;81223 said:
Ok, I guess I was getting a little ahead of myself, because I have no clue as to what some of you guys are talking about. First of all, what did you mean by "buckle", DrBatty? And what are baffles? And what are bulkheads and what is a DIY system? I guess what I need to know is, what are all the things that you need in a sump, and what do they do?
I used a rubbermaid bin to transport water once for one of my big tanks. A lot of Rubbermaids are made with a softer, pliable plastic, which can buckle, or bend under pressure i.e. putting water in it. If I am mistaken and you have one made of hard plastic, you have another problem all together - it could crack...very easily. and believe me, you do not want 20 gallons of water on your floor. Plastic is EXTREMELY porous and can have chemicals in the plastic that you can't smell or see, which could leech chemicals into the water you put in there, causing a toxic environment for your fishie friends. This could also cause buildup of chemicals you use in your tank further down the road....also problematic. Ultimately, it will give you less control of your parameters.

I've attached an image of a bulkhead for you.
They are favored by aquarists to seal around holes drilled in tanks, sumps, or refugiums, allowing water to pass through, but not leak around the surface area of the tank.
A DIY system means a system you create yourself. DIY="do-it-yourself"

If you are looking to have an octopus in your tank, it would best suit you to put as much, if not all of your equipment in your sump so the octopus doesn't get at it. You don't need much in your sump, just a good protein skimmer [skimmers are the heartbeat of your tank, don't skimp on this!], a strong powerhead to pump the water back into your tank, some sort of filtration [that is always up for debate, and every aquarist prefers different methods], and a heater if your cephalopods are tropical.

hopefully this post is helpful to you, but if you want to see what other people have set up, you should check out the tank owners database! good luck!
 

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Illithid

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#8
When they are talking about a tub "buckling" it means that the water pressure is pushing the sides out. They don't have the structural support on the long sides to hold the weight of water. I used long 33 gallon tubs. I have all three tubs butted up to each other for support and have boards on the ends that are removable. I also found that I have high water level in the first tub and a lower level in the second tub (refugium) the 1st tub would push toward the lower one. I put a board in between the two which also blocked light from the refugium to the denitrating section of the wet/dry.

Yes, you do need to support the tubs. I called the manufacturer on my tubs to be sure of the plastic toxicity and they said they were food grade quality. They didn't have anything on the labels to show that though.
 

superwaterguy52

Blue Ring
Registered
#9
Wow, thanks! But I'm still in the dark about a couple things (this is going to be one of my first attempts at saltwater aquarium keeping, so bear with me!), first of all, what's a wet/dry filter, and could someone give me a list of everthing needed to get an up and running sump, so I know where to start? And on the subject of heaters, are bimacs cold or tropical water species?
 

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