[Octopus]: Ripley - Abdopus sp My 'cephalopodic' journey-a beginner's progressive notes

DWhatley

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LOL, as you are learning there are dozens of ways to set up and maintain a saltwater aquarium (and most of them work). When looking for advice, I try to find hobbyists (not vendors) that have extended time and dialog on the specific topic I am researching but sometimes it is hard to qualify the success of the information provider. With octopuses there is still a lot of hit and miss open questions (best acclimation -- but we know it needs to be slow, best/min/max tank size, best food, how often and how much to feed are a few). We do have a few strong recommendations to avoid failure (full salinity, clean water, secure lid, basic tank mates).

Most licensed collectors in South FL are a pretty good bet as they are regulated and many have been in business a long time (other Gulf states or West Coast suppliers may be a good choice but I don't have experience there). I do recommend using a collector and not an importer to minimize the environment changes and stocking from a similar environment. There are also a few collector/suppliers in your area but they are for cold water tanks. From what I have noted from other hobbyists, California licensing is limited and most animals sold there are imports.

Personally, I often use KP Aquatics but I have known the owners for many years and did some web work for the original owner (as Sea Life Inc, father of the current owners).
 

KD5054

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Great!- I was actually talking with them via email about their hermit crabs. Glad to know they are a recommended resource.

Jumping back to corals- any thoughts on Star Polyps? I know you have to keep them to one rock or they will grow everywhere. But are they octo safe and small tank recommended?
 

DWhatley

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It is difficult to guess well with polyps. If you want to try some in the tank, make sure you can control them (ie have them on an isolated rock that can be removed) and then observe the octo when it touches them. If the octo reacts (pulls away) then remove the polyps. I have a set of brown polyps (but don't know how to id them) that I have split and placed in all my tanks because, I know them to be safe but have stopped trying others.

These may be the same species since they came from Sea Life (prior name) years ago but mine are variegated with white. They are not very attractive but are very hardy.
 

KD5054

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Star Polyps Metallic Green
This is one of the ones I was looking at. It has an ice sea bed look to it. This was the one I was wondering over due to it sounds fairly hardy.

On the same note-I am very pleased to see how many different styles and colors of mushrooms are out there. They are gorgeous.

I am currently looking into two toadstools (granted not putting two in the tank but deciding which of the two I want) and trying to decide which to go with. One is a green tip toadstool the other is a yellow tip toadstool. I am waiting to receive their actual Latin names so I can know more precisely as to what I am looking at and what to expect.

Also please correct me if I am rushing things too fast on the adding to the tank. I currently only have 2 snails, and two small mushrooms in the tank. My thought was to add possibly one or two more coral and then leave things be for awhile. OR should I be waiting longer?

I also did purchase my own salt mix and am planning to start practicing mixing my own salt water due to the excellent tip on having some ready for emergencies. Plus the fact that I have some pretty bad winters storms here during the cold months and want to be ready in case I can not get out for premixed water.
 

DWhatley

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Your tank is probably too immature for corals yet (remember these are animals too) but you might add more meat eating clean up crew so you can continue pushing your cycle without adding too heavily to the nitrates. In addition to hermits, brittle stars are pretty hardy and can often learn to be hand fed (you will need to feed the same time each day).
 

KD5054

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Thank you that was what I needed to know.
So I could look into ordering the brittle star at this time or would the hermits be a better recommended next step-In regards to one or the other?

I did amazingly narrow down my hermit choice for the tank...well sorta cheated. I asked KP aquatics for a recommendation and they had one for me. LOL That made it way easier.
 

DWhatley

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Hermits are the hardiest and can actually be fun to watch. Brittle stars are pretty reclusive but I have found the reds (actually orange) to be a bit odd in that IF I have an octopus in the tank, it is often out during the day but when there is no octopus, it seems to hide most of the time. Serpent stars seem to be less hardy than the brittles.
 

KD5054

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Perfect!
I believe that helps me with knowing what to do for my next step. :plectrono
I bet they are entertaining. But then for me I am easily happy with the little things. For example the small snail in one of my freshwater tanks is a little character. He is fun.
 

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