Red Blooded Ammonites?

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Architeuthoceras, Aug 25, 2008.

  1. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Did these guys put a hitch in the dinosaurian soft tissue fossils or just find out that ammonoids were red blooded?

    Dinosaurian Soft Tissues Interpreted as Bacterial Biofilms

    "Discovery of these spheres in an ammonite suture indicated they had no relationship to iron derived from blood. These spheres were identified as framboids which are seen world wide in black smokers, algal mats and are commonly found in sediments."

    All cephalopod blood is copper based, right???
     
  2. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

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    Yes, but not all mollusc blood (tip of the hat to Fugisawas Sake for pointing that out to me: some chitons use a form of hemoglobin)

    Of course, there's no reason to expect much (any?) of the animal's blood in the sutures, although the siphuncle is adjacent to sutures in ammonites.
     
  3. vw1

    vw1 Cuttlefish Registered

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    As do others eg the bivalve Anadara, often known as "blood ark" clams. Hemoglobin is not uncommon in molluscs, and there is no reason to believe that ammonoids didn't have it (no particular reason, however, to believe that they didn't have hemocyanin, either).
     

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