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Present and past cuttlefish owners, I need your help!

Nancy

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#1
Hi all,

On November 6, I'm going to give a presentation on Ceph Care before the Cheasapeake Bay Marine Aquarium Society in Baltimore. As far as I know, this is the first time anyone has talked about cephs to a Marine Aquarium Society group.

I wanted to list some of the reasons why people enjoy keeping octos (and/or cuttlefish) and also the negatives - what they don't like about keeping them. I've started a list, but I'd like you to help me with this - what do you like, not like.

I've posted this already on the Octo Q&A Forum, but I thought I might get more cuttle owner responses on this forum.

Thanks for your help,
Nancy
 

Nancy

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#2
Octo owners have given me lots of input on why they like (and don't like) keeping octopuses. I've received a couple of responses by PM, but most of you cuttle keepers have been mighty quiet. I will use your input in my presentation, so please respond!

Nancy
 

Paradox

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#3
Heres some reason for why I like both...

Cuttles:
-Can keep in groups if they were raised together (BIG plus)
-Seem more personable then octos
-They are much less common then octos, so the novelty factor makes them alluring.
-No sealing up the tank
-Pretty much visible at all times

Octos:
-seem to have more complex behaviours then cuttles. Not sure if this is because of physiological features (longer arms..) or a matter of intelligence.
-Each seem to have very distinct differences in personality
-More playing type activities


Hows that??
 

DHyslop

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#4
Paradox said:
Cuttles:
--They are much less common then octos, so the novelty factor makes them alluring.
I would wager most people have never even heard of a cuttlefish. I asked my geo 103 section if they knew what a Nautilus was, and only one did (and she worked at an aquarium...).

Dan
 

Paradox

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#5
DHyslop said:
I would wager most people have never even heard of a cuttlefish. I asked my geo 103 section if they knew what a Nautilus was, and only one did (and she worked at an aquarium...).

Dan

True...many assume its just some kind of fish...I usually tell people they are like an octopus..and a hovercraft... :roll:
 

Thales

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#9
Nancy said:
Hi all,

On November 6, I'm going to give a presentation on Ceph Care before the Cheasapeake Bay Marine Aquarium Society in Baltimore. As far as I know, this is the first time anyone has talked about cephs to a Marine Aquarium Society group.

How did it go? :smile:

And, I have some terrible news. Both Crissy Huffard and I have given talks on cephs to MAS's. Sorry to burst a bubble, but happy that the obsession is spreading!
 

Nancy

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#10
Very happy to hear this, Righty (no problem, no bubble) - too many people are buying cephs without understanding how to keep them, so I'm all for any way this information gets out.

My talk isn't until this Sunday.

Nancy
 

AMichels

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#12
Why I loved my cuttlefish

I was endlessly amazed/entertained when I watched my cuttlefish swim; it looked so effortless, not like how a fish swims--more like how a balloon floats.

When my cuttlefish moved from a shadowed area into the light, its color shifted to match its background like it was bending light. They're fiesty, too. If I stared at mine too long or too close it would turn red and fake a bull-rush. It would ruffle its arms, blowing them with its siphon like it was a moustache.

When they eat it reminds me of a chameleon shooting out its tongue.

Its eyes make it look so human, and you know in your head that it's looking at you, seeing you as well as you're seeing them.

But the most amazing thing is that it's alive and in your tank, and they're so sensitive . . . it makes you even more careful about maintaining your tank specs.

I keep discus, red-eyed tree frogs, freshwater plants, SPS corals, etc. There's nothing more fascinating than a cuttlefish.

Adam
 

cthulhu77

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#13
"We all float down here, Richy..."
Pennywise the clown

That is one of the best summations for why we keep cephs I have ever read, Adam. I feel the same way, as do most of the people who have interacted with them closely...you feel privileged to just be around them.

greg
 

corw314

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#14
That is an awesome explanation Adam! Some day that is my next ceph!

(And Jess and I are going!!!!) :mrgreen:
 

tonmo

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#15
Welcome back, Nancy -- how did this go?
 

Nancy

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#17
Hi all!

Well, I'm back! I'm happy to report that the presentation before the Chesapeake Marine Aquaria Society went very well. About thirty people attended and they were a receptive audience. I showed many photos of our cephs to illustrate my introduction to octos and cuttlefish, which included species, behavior and care. There were many questions afterward and still more people came up to talk with me informally. Several members even took notes and the secretary will post a summary of the talk on their website.

Carol (corw314) and her daughter Jess were there, and I was very glad - Carol brought along a scrapbook of octo photos and a couple of videos (including the one where Inklet bites Jess!) , which attracted still more interest.

After my talk there was a "frag swap", where members could buy small corals propagated by the members.

Nancy
 

KevinFJB

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#19
AMichels said:
I was endlessly amazed/entertained when I watched my cuttlefish swim; it looked so effortless, not like how a fish swims--more like how a balloon floats.

When my cuttlefish moved from a shadowed area into the light, its color shifted to match its background like it was bending light. They're fiesty, too. If I stared at mine too long or too close it would turn red and fake a bull-rush. It would ruffle its arms, blowing them with its siphon like it was a moustache.

When they eat it reminds me of a chameleon shooting out its tongue.

Its eyes make it look so human, and you know in your head that it's looking at you, seeing you as well as you're seeing them.

But the most amazing thing is that it's alive and in your tank, and they're so sensitive . . . it makes you even more careful about maintaining your tank specs.

I keep discus, red-eyed tree frogs, freshwater plants, SPS corals, etc. There's nothing more fascinating than a cuttlefish.

Adam
This sums it up for me exactly. Fascinating creatures. I have a thriving SPS reef, have had caimans, snapping turtles, piranha, cichlids, iguanas and the cuttle is by far the most interesting.
 

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