Poe Poe"s babies O. hummelincki

Lmecher

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
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#1
I noticed these little things swimming around in Poe's tank. I looked closer and they are tiny octopuses.
I know it will not be possible to raise them but I wanted to share.





 

DWhatley

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#5
corpusse,
We have not solved the riddle to getting any of the small egg species to survive. There have been a couple of small egg successes that I could find using flow through systems (in France if memory servers) and one instance of O.joubini in a TX study (but none lived to adults). Success with the large egg species is minimal but on TONMO Roy has reported good percentage survival with a large egg blue ring and Zyan Silver with a bimac. Members with smaller environments have journaled lower survival percentages but still success to adults with O.mercatoris (GHolland and me) and O.briareus (me).
 

DWhatley

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#6
Linda,
If you happen to find some when they die (not likely) and have some alcohol, could you preserve them and mail me a couple? I would like to see what they look like.
 

Lmecher

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#7
D, I have all we could find in a breeder net. I have not noticed any deaths so far. Explain the procedure, just straight alcohol?
 

DWhatley

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#8
Just put them in rubbing alcohol. They will preserve relatively well this way. I have a container of O.briareus hatchlings preserved in a small jar (assuming it has not dried out) and I would like to put them side by side for a comparison. Since both are preserved, I should be able to work with lighting enough to get a decent photograph.
 

Lmecher

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#9
I am still seeing more, so I don't think they have all hatched yet. I put some tigger pods in the breeder net. They don't seem interested.

D, I'll look for a small plastic container that I can ship them in.
 

corpusse

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#10
Lmecher;172693 said:
I am still seeing more, so I don't think they have all hatched yet. I put some tigger pods in the breeder net. They don't seem interested.

D, I'll look for a small plastic container that I can ship them in.
Why don't you try rotifers?
 

Lmecher

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#11
Where would I get them? Seeing as I am fighting a futile battle, I hate to put out an excessive amount of money on them. I am feeling torn. I don't want to just let them die without trying either. :neutral:
 

Lmecher

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#13
All babies are gone. The last ones were seen yesterday morning. They lived 3-4 days.
D, I was able to remove 2. They must decompose very fast, the 2 were the only dead ones I found. They are so tiny I bet you'll be shocked.
 

SabrinaR

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#14
Poor little babies. I so desperately wish we knew how to care for these babies.
 

kpage

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#15
Sorry Linda:sad: Do we know why some octos are small egged vs large egged? Is it something with the water temperature?
 

DWhatley

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#16
kpage,
The size of the eggs (or most importantly, if they have a planktonic stage) is species dependent and not an individual animal trait. Egg size is not the primary interest as far as raising them but is an indicator that the hatchings will be either benthic or planktonic at hatching. With known exceptions, the small egg species only brood a short time (less than a month) where the larger egg species brood for several months (species and water temperature play a part in the brooding time). One well known exception to the brooding time rule of thumb is the GPO. They are a small egg species but have been known to brood for the better part of a year in their natural environment (I don't think they brood this long in captivity though), however, they still produce planktonic young and we have not mastered raising this kind of hatchling.
 

kpage

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#17
Right, I knew that they were species dependent and about benthic/planktonic. I was really wondering if we know why some species are benthic and why other species are planktonic? Does the surrounding environment affect brooding time, which in turn affects benthic vs planktonic octos?
 

DWhatley

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#18
Does the surrounding environment affect brooding time, which in turn affects benthic vs planktonic octos?
I would have to guess not since both large and small egg species are found in the same environments (thinking of O.briareus, O. Vulgaris and O. hummelincki in particular - large, small, small). It may be that the small egg species evolved in deeper, cooler water or that the larger egg species changed over a long time because they inhabited warmer, shallower areas but this would be pretty weak conjecture. I have repeatedly read that environment, especially water temperature, impacts hatching time in any species.
 

Joe-Ceph

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#19
DWhatley;172969 said:
... however, they still produce planktonic young and we have not mastered raising this kind of hatchling.
Has anyone tried it with a kreisel type tank? The trick would be supplying the right zoo plankton to be food. Something small enough to be easily subdued by the tiny octopus, an not to large or dangerous that it eats or hurts the octoupus. Then as the octopus get larger, you'd need to do it again with a larger planktonic food, and so on until they are large enough to eat conventional food. I imagine it would be easy if one had a kreisel tank and knew what foods to use at each stage of growth, and had easy access to those foods. Learning how to do it wouldn't make anyone rich, so there's been little incentive for anyone to do the work to learn how to raise octopus that produce planktonic young, but with a lot of trial and error, I'll bet it's a problem that could be solved.
 

DWhatley

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#20
there's been little incentive for anyone to do the work to learn how to raise octopus that produce planktonic young, but with a lot of trial and error, I'll bet it's a problem that could be solved.
LOL, Somehow I think Roy would vehemently argue that assumption.
 

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