Paroctopus Digueti (Pacific Pygmy Octopus) Perrier & Rochebrune, 1894

agnoght

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Thankyou for your replies

Thankyou for your replies. I will look into this issue, maybe I can get a permit and figure this process out. My wife is a lawyer in Mexico so I think I might have the upper hand here. The hard part I think is the US side of the border. I guess that's the part I will try and figure out. I think there is a real opportunity to import this species and then breed it so no more need to be collected from the wild. So far from what I've seen it looks like a very good aquarium pet and if it's popular aquaculture would ensure species survival in my opinion. It's a nobel cause atleast. If I get it figured out I'll post again and let you all know. Anymore tips about permits would be greatly appreciated
 

cthulhu77

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There aren't any specific guidlines to the take of wild octos in mexico...the laws do govern vertebrate fishes, though.
Two years ago, we began looking for permits to obtain digueti, and met with stone looks and a large amount of disbelief from the fisheries department. So many are consumed as food and for bait by the locals that they could not fathom why anyone would want to take any back as "pets".

For almost a decade, I've been trying to rear these little guys in the states, and haven't had too much luck...but with some new equipment, and more tanks, we are hoping to have a banner year in 2006/07. It would be awesome if we could hook up information, and if both of us can raise up a generation, do some swapping of little ones for diversity.
 

DWhatley

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Population biology of Octopus digueti and the morphology of American tropical octopods. Voight, Janet Ruth 1990 (Full dissertation available)

Abstract
My dissertation explores octopod ecoloy, morphology and evolution. Using an artificial shelter trap technique (Voight, 1988a), parameters of a wild population of Octopus digueti are monitored for one year. Octopus movement correlates with sea temperature but is reduced under full moonlight. Enlarged suckers reliably indicate male maturity in this species. This first definition of an age class in octopuses allows field growth rates to be compared to those from laboratory studies. Octopus digueti growth in the wild equals that in the lab; average life span may be only 6 months during which time individuals may grow from a hatching weight of 40 mg to over 40g. Individuals show the uniparous life history documented in lab studies. Cohorts appear not due to reproductive synchrony, but to seasonal temperature fluctuations. Genetic differences probably control individual growth rate and life span. To test the reliability of morphology of preserved octopus specimens, ln-transformed measurements are plotted versus ln mantle length. Body measurements are strongly correlated with size; preservation does not therefore eliminate information contained in specimens. Principal component analysis reveals shallow water tropical octopuses vary primarily in arm length, mantle length and sucker diameter. Trans-Atlantic conspecific populations are morphologically indistinguishable. Hypothesized species relationships (Voight, 1988b) are supported, despite considerable overlap among species. No secondary sexual dimorphism except enlarged suckers is present in these species. Octopuses from rocky habitats have longer arms and smaller mantles than do those from sandy habitats. In the Octopodidae, arm length, head width and sucker diameter contribute most size-free morphological variation. Sucker size correlates inversely with depth due to hydrostatic pressure. Arm length and head width variation correlate inversely with latitudinal distribution, and are associated with the number of sucker rows. Subfamilies defined by the number of sucker rows (Voss, 1988a), may represent overtly similar, paraphyletic groups. Cladistic analysis of the suborder Incirrata show that Voss' subfamilies are paraphyletic groups; Robson's (1932) subfamilies are supported. The Argonautida are the most primitive incirrate group, the Ctenoglossa and Octopodidae are sister taxa. The incirrate octopods may have evolved from a deep sea, rather than a shallow-water, ancestor.
 

DWhatley

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Movement, injuries and growth of members of a natural population of the Pacific pygmy octopus, Octopus digueti
Janet R voight 2009 (subscription)

Abstract
Sampling inadequacies and an inability to distinguish age classes have limited our knowledge of octopus biology in nature. Using an artificial shelter sampling technique (Voight, 1988a), and defining mature males by the presence of enlarged suckers (Voight, In press), an intertidal population of Octopus digueti was monitored for one year.
In total, 803 octopuses were narcotized; the mass, sex, arm injuries and reproductive condition of each octopus were recorded. Captures were more frequent in lower intertidal areas offering higher shelter availability and a more moderate environment. Capture rates, assumed to indicate octopus movement, correlated with sea temperature except during full moon periods when they were reduced. Over 26%, of the octopuses handled had damaged arms or arm tips, with dorsal arm pairs more often injured. The overall sex ratio was significantly male biased, probably due to maturity-linked mobility differences between the sexes.
Reproduction occurred throughout the year; reproductively competent adults, brooding females and juveniles were present every month. However, annual temperature oscillations synchronize spring hatching of eggs spawned from winter to early spring, creating a clear spring cohort. Growth and age at maturity of males in the spring and autumn cohorts were estimated. Variance was too high for these parameters to be estimated in the winter cohort. Growth rates of males over 12 weeks of age did not differ from those reported in laboratory rearing studies. Estimated average age at maturity ranged from 20 to 32 weeks, depending on temperature.
 

DWhatley

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Laboratory Growth, Reproduction and Life Span of the Pacific Pygmy Octopus,
Octopus digueti'
RANDAL H . D ER USHA, JOHN W. FORSYTHE AND R OGER T. HANLON2 1988 (pdf)


ABSTRACT:
Octopus digueti Perrier and Rochebrune, 1894 was reared through
its life cycle at 25°C in a closed seawater system using artificial sea water. Two
field-collected females produced 231 hatchlings: 193 hatchlings were groupcultured
while 24 were isolated at hatching and grown individually to allow
precise analyses of growth in length and weight over the life cycle. All octopuses
were fed primarily live shrimps. Maturing adults fed at a rate of 4.7% of body
weight per day and had a gross growth efficiency of 48% . Growth in weight was
exponential for the first 72 days and described best by the equation: WW(g) =
.0405e·0646t. The mean growth rate over this period was 6.4% increase in body
weight per day (%jd) , with no significant difference between male and female
growth. From 72 to 143 days , growth was logarithmic and described best by the
equation: WW(g) = (6.78 x 1O- 6) t3 .13 . Females grew slightly faster than males
over this growth phase. During the exponential growth phase, mantle length
increased at a mean rate of 2.1% per day, declining to 1.1% per day over the
logarithmic phase. No attempt was made to describe mathematically the period
of declining growth rate beyond day 143. The primary causes of early mortality
in group culture were escapes and cannibalism. Survival was good despite high
culture density: 73% survival to date of first egg laying (day Il l). Survival was
better among the isolated growth-study octopuses: 88% to the date of first egg
laying (day 130). Mean life span was 199 da ys in group-reared octopuses and
221 days in the growth-study octopuses. There was no significant difference
between male and female life span. Progeny of the group culture were reared at
similar stocking densities and fed predominantly fresh dead shrimp and crab
meat. This diet resulted in cannibalism, with only 6% survival to first egg laying
on day 128. Fecundity in this group was lower. Octopus digueti is a good
candidate for laboratory culture and biological experimentation because of its
small size, rapid growth, short life span, and good survival in group culture.
 

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