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Ordovician Crinoids

Solius

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#1
These were collected from "garden" that has been very rich in specimens. They appear to be diblobathrid camerates from the Shermanian of Kentucky. I have a pretty good ideal of the family and genus, but as I am learning the crinoids, am wondering what others think?



A couple of buddies hanging out.


Closeups of the ones above.

 

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Solius

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#3
Those are diplobathrids not diblobathrids.

Here is a different camerate from the same outcrop.


And another diplobathrid. Note the intimately associated odontopleurid trilobite(sans cephalon). Those are rather rare, here.

A nearly complete odontopleurid(Primaspis sp.)


I don't want to spam the forum, so I will stop with this last one. It is three on a small slab. I have many multiples.
 

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Terri

Sepia elegans
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#5
I don't want to spam the forum, so I will stop with this last one
No need to stop posting! Beautifully preserved Crinoids to be as old as they are, I can't help with ids. either. In the Ordovician rocks I hunt here in middle Tennessee I mainly find bits and pieces of stems and holdfasts, nothing yet as complete as yours. :cool:


Awesome bugs!:trilobit:
 

Solius

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#6
Terri;188056 said:
No need to stop posting! Beautifully preserved Crinoids to be as old as they are, I can't help with ids. either. In the Ordovician rocks I hunt here in middle Tennessee I mainly find bits and pieces of stems and holdfasts, nothing yet as complete as yours. :cool:


Awesome bugs!:trilobit:
Thanks for the welcome. I have tons of Ord. bugs, but they are from different outcrops, so I'll save those for another day. Here is some of the faunal assemblage associated with the crinoids. These things are associated with rip-up clasts at the base of the bed, so they are probably tempestites; that would explain the articulation of the crinoids.

The site is littered with rhynconellids



And strophomenids, too. This one is covered with worm tubes(jCornulites sp)


Gotta run, will post more, later.
 

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Solius

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#7
Terri;188056 said:
No need to stop posting! Beautifully preserved Crinoids to be as old as they are, I can't help with ids. either. In the Ordovician rocks I hunt here in middle Tennessee I mainly find bits and pieces of stems and holdfasts, nothing yet as complete as yours. :cool:


Awesome bugs!:trilobit:
Thanks for the welcome. I have lots of trilobites, but they are from other outcrops. Here is some of the fauna from the crinoid outcrop:

The place is littered with rhynconellids


There are loads of strophomenids, too.(with epibionts-Cornulites)



There are 4 different Orders of bryozoans represented: trepostomate, cyclostomate, cryptostomate, and cystoporate. This one is a trepostomate(I will post some others, later)


I will post other fauna from the outcrop, later.
 

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Terri

Sepia elegans
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#8
Here is some of the fauna from the crinoid outcrop:
Wow, looks a lot like the Lebanon limestone here, tons of strophomenids, rhynchonellids, bryozoans (most of which aren't id'd yet), some cephalopods (not as many as I would like), graptolites, and just a few bits and pieces of trilobites, several different types of corals. 8-)
 

Terri

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#10
Hi Solius! The first pic. in post nine, what is it? I tried googling bysonnichiid and didn't get any results. Is it a trilobite part?:hmm:
 

Solius

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#11
That should read *ambonychiid*. It is probably a Bissonychia sp. bivalve. I find a lot of ambonychiids, but usually they are much smaller than the one in the photo.
 

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