ONE FISH, TWO FISH, THREE FISH, OARFISH! MAYBE!

Discussion in 'The Octopus' Den' started by Clem, Jun 25, 2003.

  1. Clem

    Clem Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Sea-serpents have been making mischief up Novia Scotia way:

    http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2003/06/24/sea_serpent030624

    An oarfish? Possibly, though the CBC's writer seems to think they're a recent discovery. But, why would an oarfish go around with its head (and gills) above water?

    :|

    Clem
     
  2. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

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    just simply for dramatic effect perhaps?

    Swimming about with the jaws theme in its head?
     
  3. myopsida

    myopsida Vampyroteuthis Supporter

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    Oarfish swim with the body held vertically, moving by a scullling motion of the dorsal fin (as do seahorses). Whatever this guy saw it wasn't an oarfish. As round as a 5-gallon bucket doesn't fit an oarfish either - they are flattened like a plank of wood. More likely an undescribed species of giant eel (yes - there is an unknown giant eel out there, known only from its larval form - a leptocephalus which grows to 4 or five times the size of the leptocepahii of other known eels.
     
  4. Clem

    Clem Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Myopsida,

    You're right, the "five-gallon bucket" standard of measure doesn't seem applicable to a flat-bodied animal.

    An enormous eel would be exciting, but what would one be doing loitering at the surface, sticking its head out of the water? Aerial gaping from great whites is one thing: their gills are set far back enough from the mouth to make the practice survivable. Most eels have their gills near the jaw-hinge (excepting the lamprey, which has a row of holes for gill apertures on either side of its body).

    Have you seen footage of an oar-fish and its motive posture? I'd love to see one go.

    Clem
     
  5. myopsida

    myopsida Vampyroteuthis Supporter

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    Clem
    There is an image of an oarfish in typical swimming posture at:
    http://www.oceanicresearch.org/jpegs/oarfish.jpg

    As you can see, a long way from horizontal serpent-like movement. Freshwater eels are capable of moving across damp ground out of water during thier migrations - there is no reason that a marine eel wouldn't be capable of sticking is head out of water to check out nearby objects. I've seen conger eels swimming at the surface regularly. A giant eel would be virtually impossible to catch in a trawl or on a line so its not surprising that it remains "unknown"
     
  6. cthulhu77

    cthulhu77 Titanites Supporter

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    I kinda like the Giant Lamprey idea...or maybe some sort of mutated jellyfish bombarded by gamma rays????
    Gosh.
     
  7. Clem

    Clem Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Myopsida,

    Thanks much for the oarfish image. Frankly, I'm growing weary of their ubiquity as "sea-serpents." So often have oarfish been used to "explain" all strange, serpentiform beasties, you'd think they were taking over.

    In any event, the mega-eel theory handily trumps the "long-necked seal" and "cryogenically preserved plesiosaur" theories I've heard.

    Clem
     
  8. Clem

    Clem Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Greg,

    Don't go there.

    Clem
     
  9. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    An extremely rare Oarfish was found washed up at Perth Australia two days ago. From the Sydney Morning Herald:

     

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  10. erich orser

    erich orser Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    Eeggad!

    What a waste of a good specimen!
     
  11. cthulhu77

    cthulhu77 Titanites Supporter

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    Uh oh...they probably can it and sell it as "sea badger"!
     
  12. chrono_war01

    chrono_war01 Colossal Squid Supporter

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    "sea badger" Ha! Nonsense. But I'm sure I've seen poeple who dumped and ate very rare fish before. Not uncommon if you don't know the differnce between a small bimac and a over large dwarf octo.
     

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