Octopus vulgaris | The Octopus News Magazine Online
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Octopus vulgaris

petromir

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#1
Hi together,

after I failed with tropical species from Asia (I reported here), I fianlly received an octopus vulgaris from Spain. And this one is healthy...just see for yourself. It`s now in a 55 gallon tank and will move to a 200 gallon in spring.

Take care!

Markus
 

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DWhatley

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#2
I am jealous! Beautiful animal and indeed appears healthy. Please keep an active journal as we only see a few vulgaris and don't have a journal for Mediteranean variety.
 

petromir

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#3
Hello,

This guy is really active and not nocturnal like the dwarfs. As I cleaned the glass today it came to inspect the magnet cleaner. One can now see how big the Octo is. I`m also amazed how it can change it`s skin, not only in color but also in shape. See for yourself.

Take care!
 

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DWhatley

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#4
If you leave the magnet in the tank (some people do, I know) we have seen two things occur. One the animal will pry it apart and you will hear it crash to the floor often or two, it will get an arm wedged. The first is somewhat humerous and at least one learned to call his food slave this way but the other can be damaging.

These are one of my favorite species. I won't likely ever keep one but my current animal is either a very, very large joubini (my guess) or a very, very small vulgaris. Her personality is vulgaris like, she is fiesty and an all time favorite.
 

tonmo

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#5
Great, thanks for sharing! Added to the homepage slideshow. :thumbsup:
 

petromir

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#7
Hello,

I`m keeping it at 21 degrees celsius.

Thanks for the advice I removed the magnet cleaner.

This guy behaves like a dog, begging for food all the time, very active and not shy at all.

Attached is an image of today!

Take care!

How often should one feed them? I`m thinking of 3 time a week...
 

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DWhatley

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#8
Feeding frequency has been discussed in numerous threads with varying suggestions. Roy and JoeCeph feel that, for the cold water species, bimaculoides, minimizing frequency to two or three times a week extends their lifespan. We offer food dailh, especially when they are young, and fast them once a week. My bimac is only interested in food about every other day now that he is adult. My joubini paces at feeding time daily and gives you a saltwater bath if you are late. She does not like fast days at all and sometimes gets something small because she is obviously hungry.

You may want to lower you temperature. Check the temps of where it was caught and keep to the lower end of the warm (summer) temperatures as you high as this should help with longevity.
 

tonmo

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#10
Thanks for bumping this Carol.

Petromir, he looks great! What Carol said...
 

petromir

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#11
Hi,

the octo is still ok, but I believe the octo is bored...when I enter the fish room it immedantely comes to the front glass bagging for food or at least some attention...any idea if a toy could help? What about the trick opening containers? I will make another short video shortly.

Thanks

Markus
 

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petromir

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#12
Hello together,

the octo behaves totally different to the dwarfs I kept (for a a short period...) so far: It is active, also during the day, comes immedantely to the front when I enter the room and plays with food like a cat. A wonderful animal. It also catches life ghost shrimps with the skin between its arms. Very interesting to watch. The octo acts like a a net. Attached is a new vid. I will report agin shortly.

Thanks

Markus
 

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petromir

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#13
Hi,

yesterday I realized that he has on one arm, at the end, what looks like a white ring of about 5mm. On this part of his arm are no suckers and it`s thinner like the rest and just white. I will try to make an image. Any idea what this is? Illness, injury or a defect?

Thanks

Markus
 

tonmo

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#15
Nice! That's the hectocotylus, right?
 

DWhatley

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#16
Petromir,
LOL, if this is the third arm to the right (clockwise, orienting your eyes with the octopus eyes), you have a male octopus :grin:. Here is a link to a thread with photos of the hectocotylus in several species

Very good observation! Most new keepers look and can't find this sign. A closer look (easier on some octopuses than others) you will see a spermataphore channel running the length of the arm. I find that easier to see in photos than in a live animal :old:.

I prefer getting males. A female will brood even infertile eggs and you lose association with the animal over the brood cycle. Males seem to live slightly longer in captivity and do not go through the sequestered time.
 

DWhatley

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#18
I have had another species (O. hummelincki) that had a section of arm where the suckers did not grow but I could see circles where the suckers should have been. I never knew for sure if this was an arm that did not grow back properly or a flaw in the arm. I suspected an arm that was damaged but not removed and wondered if clipping off the arm would regenerate a healthier arm. I did not remove the arm though as an open wound can easily lead to infection and he had no difficulty using it.

It the arm fully healed? One thing to watch for is infection if there is a new wound.
 

Cuddlycuttlefsh

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#19
When you clip off an Octopus arm, is it the equivalence of having a part of their brain chopped off? It amazes me that they can still live after the shock.:goofysca:
 

DWhatley

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#20
I would not clip off an arm unless it was not healing properly, and then only with great hesitation but that is a personal choice and not a problem for the octopus. They regenerate their arms and lose them (or parts of them) in the wild on a regular basis, it is extremely rare to receive one that has all arms in tact. Some species can break off their arms if a preditor has them trapped and we have seen this even in the aquarium with Abdopus.
 

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