Octopus Vulgaris (Common Octopus) Cuvier, 1797

Discussion in 'Octopodidae' started by DWhatley, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Selection of HD video clips featuring Octopus vulgaris
    Published on Apr 12, 2012


    For content licensing, please contact our video editor, Basia Goszczynska, at odbasi@gmail.com. For more info, please visit: http://www.mbl.edu/mrc/hanlon


     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Classic Camouflage Video by Roger Hanlon

    Interview with Dr Hanlon that includes a brief discussion on capturing his famous camo sequence.

     
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  3. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The effect of predatory presence on the temporal organization of activity in Octopus vulgaris
    Daniela V. Meisel, Michael Kuba, Ruth A. Byrne,Jennifer Mather - 2013 full article


    This is of particular note to keepers and the observed period of activity of O. vulgaris:

     
  4. GPO87

    GPO87 Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    That second quote is interesting, D. I always thought that Octopus were very visual predators, but I can see how they would be tactile foragers too.
     
  5. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    In spite of the literature, I have come to believe it is species dependent. When you see video of any of the animals with long webbing you will note that they envelope rock or pieces of coral and then explore with their arms or suckers to find food. All of our O. briareus and my current O. vulgaris (I think, a recent paper has me confused on what has been labeled Caribbean vulgaris and the attributes of O. burryi. This paper would make Margay O. burryi but Norman and many others - including the video at the top of this thread - note the patterning as O. vulgaris) have been extremely far sighted and can see very little close up. Margay often gets spooked when she realizes our hands are close by so we have to move our fingers to let her know proximity. The O. hummelincki I have kept seem to see much more sharply and have appeared to recognize different people as well as to hunt visually. They lack the extreme webbing of the other two and this may be a clue for visual acuity.
     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    [h=5]Phylogeographical Features of Octopus vulgaris and Octopus insularis in the Southeastern Atlantic Based on the Analysis of Mitochondrial Markers[/h] João Bráullio De Luna Sales, Péricles Sena Do Rego , Alexandre Wagner S. Hildorf , Angela A. Moreira , Manuel Haimovici , Acácio R. Tomás , Bruno B. Batista , Reynaldo A. Marinho , Unai Markaida ,Horacio Schneider. and Iracilda Sampaio

    Subscription to BioOne required for full article
    [h=3]ABSTRACT[/h] The genus Octopus occurs in tropical and temperate oceanic waters throughout the world, and currently includes 112 species, although the phylogenetic relationships among the different taxa are still poorly understood. The cosmopolitan Octopus vulgaris is one of the most widely analyzed cephalopods in genetic studies, primarily because of its ample range and the problems associated with the morphological identification of specimens, which indicate the possible existence of a species complex with a worldwide distribution. Two large-bodied octopus species—O. vulgaris and Octopus insularis—are found in the western South Atlantic. The limits of the geographical range of the O. insularis are still unclear. The current study is based on a phylogeographic analysis of the 2 species in the South Atlantic, with the objective of confirming their monophyletic status and the limits of their geographical distribution in this region. The analyses were based on the mitochondrial genes 16S rDNA and Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I (COI). The topologies generated for both genes confirmed the monophyletíc status of the 2 species. In the case of O. vulgaris, it was possible to confirm the monophyletic status of the specimens from this region relative to those of other areas around the world, although 3 distinct haplogroups were clearly differentiated, corresponding to the Americas, Europe and Africa, and Asia. The differentiation among these 3 groups may be determined by the limitations of the dispersal of paralarvae among continents. Further studies are needed to confirm the possible occurrence of distinct groups in the western South Atlantic, as well as the influence of oceanic currents on the phylogeographical distribution of O. vulgaris on the Brazilian coast
     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Behavioural observations of the common octopus Octopus vulgaris in Baía dos Tigres, southern Angola
    CL de Beer, WM Potts 2013 (subscription)

     
  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    THE HEARTBEAT OF OCTOPUS VULGARIS
    M. J. WELLS 1978 (pdf)

     
  9. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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  10. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    An integration of historical records and genetic data to the assessment of global distribution and population structure in Octopus vulgaris
    Daniele De Luca, GAETANO CATANESE, Gabriele Procaccini and Graziano Fiorito

     
  11. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS IN OCTOPUS VULGARIS
    D. V. Meisel, R. A. Byrne, M. Kuba, U. Griebel, J. A. Mather 2003 (full pdf)

     
  12. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Behavioral Sleep in Octopus Vulgaris
    D. V. meiSel, r. A. BYrne, J. A. mAtHer 3, m. KuBA

     
  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Reproductive Biology of the Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris Cuvier, 1797) in South Kenya
    G.M. Kivengea1 , M.J. Ntiba1,2, D.O. Sigana1 and A.W. Muthumbi 2014 (full pdf)

     
  14. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Morphological assessment of the Octopus vulgaris species complex evaluated in light of molecular-based phylogenetic inferences
    Michael D. Amor, Mark D. Norman, Alvaro Roura, Tatiana S. Leite, Ian G. Gleandall, Amanda Reid, Catalina Perales-Raya, Chung-Chen Lu, Colin J. Silvey, Erica A. G. Vidal, Frederick G. Hochberg, Xiaodong Zheng, Jan M. Strugnell 2016 (Wiley Subscription)

     

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