Octopus joubini (Atlantic Pygmy Octopus)

Discussion in 'Joubiniteuthidae' started by gillsandfins, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. gillsandfins

    gillsandfins Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello All,

    I'm new to this forum and I'm interested in aquiring a octo. Does or has anyone owned a Octopus joubini as a pet? I have found an online retailer that has them in stock. Will this make a good pet or should I be looking for another kind?

    Any info would be great.

    Thanks

    Jake
     
  2. daddysquoc

    daddysquoc Wonderpus Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    0
    :welcome: to TONMO.

    O.joubinis, like many dwarf species, are often nocturnal and short-lived. If possible, i would look into another species.
     
  3. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,887
    Likes Received:
    11
    a few years ago, a lot of the octos sold as joubini were actually large-egged mercatoris, for what that's worth. People kept them occasionally a few years ago, but I don't think we've seen any recently. They do seem to be quite similar to mercs except for egg size.
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Jake,
    You have a LOT of reading to do! Start with the articles (link on the banner) and take a break by reading the experiences of two new members acquiring their first dwarf in the last week:

    http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/10187/
    http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/10183/

    It is unlikely that the octos (in spite of the description) are O. joubini and much more likely they are O. mercatoris (which is a good thing). Edit - I see Monty has mentioned this while I was typing.

    If you are ready and willing to read through some longer histories then read these journals and the links within the journasl that refer back to the parents and grandparent:

    http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/9144/
    http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/9449/

    While you are doing that, you might also want to pick up the newly released book authored by two of our staff:

    http://www.amazon.com/Cephalopods-O...6585/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1229232478&sr=1-1
     
  5. gillsandfins

    gillsandfins Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    WOW!! Thanks for all the fast replies. I looked over most of the posts in the links. I have a 250 reef system with a 20 tall linked to it which has been drilled. I'm currently using the 20 tall as a frag tank and was thinking of putting an octo in it. So what can you tell me about O. mercatoris?

    Thanks

    Jake
     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Anything I can pass on to you about raising mercs can pretty much be found in the last link I posted above as that link and the connecting histories are my personal experiences. The first two links (to our new keepers journals) include some of my recent, uh, coaching :smile:.

    I have not experimented with any corals with the mercs and only a little with the hummelincki (my diurnal octo) so I can't give any first hand experience on what to avoid but I would reconsider using a frag tank if you have recent cuttings as the water is likely to have a lot of stinging cells. Additionally, if you need to have a light on the frag tank for the corals, you will likely never see your octo. My best successes with interaction with the mercs has been with a red light only tank.

    In a conch shell, I can tell you that they find barnacles and live rock acceptable homes, they are very shy and only a few will interact regularly. The twenty is a good size. You need a minimum of octo-proofing (lowering the water level and a loose fitting top seem to be all that is needed for this species ONLY). I recommend using a red velum (either on the light it self or over the transparent part of the top) to change your lighting (LED's work but the velum filtered light seems to be antecdotally better), leave the red light on 24/7, feed them live fiddlers several times a week and attempt to stick feed (one of our newest keepers found that a straw works very well) a small shrimp of some kind daily. Lastly, keeping them where they can observe you on a regular schedule but where there is not a lot of fast movement and nightly taking the time to sit in front of what will sometimes seem to be an empty tank will likely give you the most enjoyment from your individuals personality.
     
  7. DinoIgnacio

    DinoIgnacio O. vulgaris Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great advice D! Wow, you covered all the important points in one paragraph! Brilliant.
     
  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    My once in a blue moon paraphrasing :wink:
     
  9. gillsandfins

    gillsandfins Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have to agree with Dino. Well said. The 20 tall I want to put one in is currently a frag tank, but if I were to get one I was planning on moving the frags to a different tank. I have everything needed to keep one except a place to buy one. Is there an online retailer or breeder that you would recommend? Would the red light used for reptiles work or wold that be to much? one more question. About how large do they get? I have a book with a little information on dwarf octos and it gives a broad range of 8 in. is this close?

    Thanks for the help.

    Jake
     
  10. DinoIgnacio

    DinoIgnacio O. vulgaris Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    I highly recommend the Cephalopods book by Nancy and Colin. http://icanhaz.com/cephalopods
    It's great and informative reading cover to cover! It covers everything you need to know about the more popular breeds of octopodes.

    Mercs don't grow too big, they have an average mantel size of 1.75 inches. and have 2-3 inch arms.

    You probably want a small LED lamp as the red lamps that are used for reptiles generate heat. Your octo will prefer a temperature of the lower 70s. I use one of these http://www.petdiscounters.com/Marina-Micro-LED-Aquarium-Light-Red-p7280.html
    But after reading what D wrote, I think I will try red vellum over my other lights as well.
     
  11. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    :thumbsup:I am beginning to feel un-needed (but I am still going to watch!) :mrgreen:.

    We found that the velum will work when placed directly over the transparent cover if it will completely block the white light (aquarium and lighting setup are a big dependency). Be sure you use a velum that is rated for high temperatures (like the kind rated for tail lights in temporary automobile repairs - remember I am from the south ...). I found a good vendor on eBay if you don't find it locally.

    Our two new members acquired their mercs from a fellow TONMO member, Danthemarineman. I believe the mercs are by-catch from the cultivated live rock where he works. Dan is not often on the site but if you click the link and look directly under his avitar, you will see Send Message followed by a drop down menu arrow. The drop down provides the option to send a message via email to be able to contact him directly.
     
  12. DinoIgnacio

    DinoIgnacio O. vulgaris Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    No!!!! We would be lost without your patient guidance!
     
  13. snailkicker

    snailkicker Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jake

    I collected my own O. joubini in St Josephs Bay, FLA. These were collected in Jan and water temps were below 50 degrees F (froze my but off with just a wet suite). They were collected in about 2-3 feet of water snorkeling. They were hard to find at first but after you get the search image down I collected 8 specimens for some behavioral reserch in about 2 hours. I dont know about O. joubini from other locations - but in St Jo Bay they are known for taking over old snail shells where they will grab a small bivalve shell as well and use it as an operculum to close the door when they get in. They also will take two bivalve shells and hold them together like its a live clam. Fascinating to watch them manipulate all of this gear in an aquarium. When collecting them you learn to look for a clam or snail that doesnt look "right" or seems out of place. Easy to collect as you just have to pick up the snail/clam shells they are hiding in and place them in a container.

    I had no problem keeping mine in seprate 20 gal aquaria. They fed readily on live hermet crabs collected nearby. They all survivied about a month in captivity and I understand that that is normal for a specimen collected as an adult. As I said - these were for research and not pets as such. Their feeding response seems to be activated by movement - so you might get them to take small pieces of fish or shrimp off of a long feeding stick dangled in view.

    Unlike the vulgaris specimens I have kept - they seem to aclimate to the presence of an observer and will go about their business as though you are not there. They are active mostly dusk to dark and return to their adopted home with dawn if not before.
     

Share This Page